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Old 11-17-2013, 08:06 AM   #1
TheRadBaron OP
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Torque-to-angle clutch bolts. What's the going method?

I'm sure this information is on here somewhere, but I haven't had any luck finding it. Sorry. Anyway, I'm removing the clutch on my '97 R1100GS and I noticed that the bolts that hold the pressure plate to the flywheel require being tightened to a specific wrench angle.
I also understand that the bolts aren't reusable. I have new bolts and I have a torque wrench but I don't have an angle wrench. If I understand the manual correctly it states to oil the threads and initially torque the bolts to 40Nm, then give them an initial 32 degrees of tightening.
I don't think an angle wrench is in most people's tool boxes. Is there a decent way to do this without the special tool? If I need to I'll buy the angle wrench. I did a web search and it looks like you can get an angle-attachment for a standard ratchet for around $10. Not a big deal, but I'd like to know if it really is necessary or not.
Thanks.
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Old 11-17-2013, 09:01 AM   #2
JimVonBaden
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Originally Posted by TheRadBaron View Post
I'm sure this information is on here somewhere, but I haven't had any luck finding it. Sorry. Anyway, I'm removing the clutch on my '97 R1100GS and I noticed that the bolts that hold the pressure plate to the flywheel require being tightened to a specific wrench angle.
I also understand that the bolts aren't reusable. I have new bolts and I have a torque wrench but I don't have an angle wrench. If I understand the manual correctly it states to oil the threads and initially torque the bolts to 40Nm, then give them an initial 32 degrees of tightening.
I don't think an angle wrench is in most people's tool boxes. Is there a decent way to do this without the special tool? If I need to I'll buy the angle wrench. I did a web search and it looks like you can get an angle-attachment for a standard ratchet for around $10. Not a big deal, but I'd like to know if it really is necessary or not.
Thanks.
For the 180 head bolts I eyeball it. However, if you are uncomfortable with eyeballing it you can make your own angle gauge with a piece of cardboard with a circle on it. Cut a hole in it for the ratchet and mark off 32.

Absolute precision is not critical. 32+-2 is fine.

Jim
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Old 11-17-2013, 05:12 PM   #3
AntonLargiader
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For ten bucks, just get the angle adapter. Then give it to the next guy who needs it.
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Old 11-17-2013, 05:51 PM   #4
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Yeah, you're probably right. It's just that often the manual (any manual) that you're using insists that you MUST use the special tool. In some cases this is legitimate and there really isn't a good way to do it without the tool, but a lot of the time there's a more conventional way of doing the task with totally acceptable results.
I'll probably buy the angle gauge, though. I really believe in the proper tightening of fasteners. I used to be an aircraft mechanic so maybe it's a carryover from those days.
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Old 11-17-2013, 06:03 PM   #5
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If the bolt gets turned 32, it doesn't care how you got there. The BMW tool is pretty much the same as the others on the market; it's the outcome that matters. You can make a protractor out of paper if it gets you to 32.

$10 is cheap compared to the new TechAngle wrenches for nearly $500.
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Old 11-18-2013, 03:14 AM   #6
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This is what I used on a R1100 recently. Makes the job uber simple. There are cheaper units but I like this puppy...

http://www.amazon.com/Lisle-28100-To...ue+angle+gauge

Torque to yield bolts are getting common and you can never have too many tools.
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Old 11-18-2013, 05:19 AM   #7
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Circumference is Pi X D. So if your wrench is 12" long then D is 24". Pi=3.14159. C=75.39816. So 32/360 X 75.39816=6.70205 or ~ 6.7"

Move the end of the handle of your wrench 6.7" across the arc which will equal 32 degrees, if you have a 12" wrench.
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Old 11-18-2013, 05:24 AM   #8
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But I don't have a circular ruler, either :(
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Old 11-18-2013, 05:28 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by TheRadBaron View Post
But I don't have a circular ruler, either :(
You do not have a piece of string and a pin?

Might be this is beyond your skill set and you should have someone else do it!

Jim
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Old 11-18-2013, 05:39 AM   #10
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Yeah...maybe you're right. I could sell the GS and get a Harley. You just need a hammer and adjustable wrench for those, right?
A chrome hammer and chrome adjustable wrench, that is.
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Old 11-18-2013, 09:30 AM   #11
Jim Moore
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Tighten to the correct torque, then mark the flywheel at a corner on each bolt. Turn the bolt until the mark is in the center of the next flat. Voila`!
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Old 11-18-2013, 09:51 AM   #12
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Ta da. it's done. Nice one Mr. Moore.
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Old 11-18-2013, 04:07 PM   #13
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If that, with your eyeball, gets you to 32 then OK. I just had an Airhead bike come through that lost its flywheel bolts. The repair will be well over $1000 and that is with used parts. Clutch carrier, disk, bolts, other clutch parts, and the labor to remove the crank completely and repair the related damage.

Or a $10 tool that you will still have afterward. Your choice.
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Old 11-18-2013, 04:56 PM   #14
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I'm going to get the tool. It's cheap enough as to be a non-issue and like I said, I'm particular to proper fastener procedures.
I just asked originally as much out of curiosity as anything else. This is my first experience with using torque-angle instead of conventional torquing. Sorry, I'm sure the terms aren't technically correct.
The idea of torquing to an angle rather than a foot-pound or Newton-meter spec makes a lot of sense after I read up on it. Seems to take a lot of the variables away and make for a more accurate torque.

P.S. Anton, I've sent you a few emails from the email address that's a lot like my username here but I haven't heard back after the first response you sent. Have you been getting them? Thanks again.
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Old 11-18-2013, 08:48 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Moore View Post
Tighten to the correct torque, then mark the flywheel at a corner on each bolt. Turn the bolt until the mark is in the center of the next flat. Voila`!
Pretty slick except for the fact the socket covers the bolt so you can't see the flat .

One would have to turn the socket guessing if you've gone far enough, remove to inspect, turn some more, inspect, turn some more, inspect, whoops.. too far.

I prefer one smooth, fluid motion when torqueing. Spend the 10 bucks.
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