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Old 05-27-2014, 04:51 PM   #421
haildamage
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kurtw View Post
First Altrider luggage on the White Rim?

looks great!

just fit mine on a 2014 350 EXC-F. would love to see closeups of where you hooked the lower straps.

did you use tubing to protect the straps from your boots? i did but not sure if i have found the perfect tubing for that yet. i think it would include a bit of tubing that is perfectly suited for this purpose.

did you use a heat shield. i put one on since i bought one but i am not sure that it would be necessary the way the bag fits the plastic on this bike. better safe than sorry i suppose.

i will get mine out on the trail the weekend of June 7th and will try to post some pics after that.
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Old 05-27-2014, 05:45 PM   #422
kurtw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haildamage View Post
looks great!

just fit mine on a 2014 350 EXC-F. would love to see closeups of where you hooked the lower straps.
HD:

This is a 2013 350 EXC-F. What a bike, huh!?

Quote:
did you use tubing to protect the straps from your boots? i did but not sure if i have found the perfect tubing for that yet. i think it would include a bit of tubing that is perfectly suited for this purpose.

My lower straps are done as shown earlier in the thread. The fit is so good with no long run of webbing on this bike so I don't see anything to be concerned about with rubbing. On my 690, the run is longer and I thread the webbing through a piece of bicycle inner tube where it contacts the bodywork and frame to protect everything.





Quote:
did you use a heat shield. i put one on since i bought one but i am not sure that it would be necessary the way the bag fits the plastic on this bike. better safe than sorry i suppose.
I did use an old GL heat shield that I had around since I hadn't yet received the Altrider one before I left. They both do the job. I felt it was necessary for this bike/bag combo.

Quote:
i will get mine out on the trail the weekend of June 7th and will try to post some pics after that.
Let's see it!
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Old 05-27-2014, 06:03 PM   #423
kurtw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wachs View Post
I think you are the first Kurt - nice pic. How'd you like the set up?
All of my gear for this trip worked great. My only complaints are about the things that I forgot to pack… So, ok. Here are my thoughts on the luggage. Let me know if you have any questions.

Preface: Firstly, I was riding a KTM 350EXC, a very light nimble bike on which I would definitely feel a load if not packed and carried well. Also, my fuel tank is only 3g so I needed to carry extra fuel to allow for enough capacity and reserve. Secondly, this was a single night, warm-weather desert trip. What this means is that I packed very light in terms of clothing and shelter. But, on the other hand, there was no access to clean water so we had to carry enough water for two days of arid riding and camping.

Disclaimer: I’ve been a fan of all of Wach’s designs, new and old.

Tank bag:

Like similar tank bags, the fit on a bike like this is great. My filler cap is off-center and the bag still fits good. There were no issues venting the tank even though my vent hose kinks down a little. I had installed a nice vent hose that was thick, yet pliable to minimize potential venting issues (from left-over plumbing from desmogging the bike).

The tank was out of the way for this type of riding on all but the steepest climbs where I would hold the tank and bag between my knees.

I kept the folded NPS White Rim map in the lid window for referencing the campgrounds and side roads/trails as we came to them.

The main benefit of the tank bag on this trip was being able to carry some fluids and weight up front where they belong and get it off the rear of the bike. The tank bag contained my small tool bag, a 2 liter water bladder, and odds and ends such as sun screen and lip balm.

It worked great for this. No rain on this trip so some other poor soul will have to review the rain-proofness.

Saddle bags:

Due to the length of the trip and size of my fuel tail, I carried one gallon of extra fuel in bottlers within the saddle bags. Each of the rear pockets held a 1.5L Primus bottle and one more 1L bottle was tucked inside. At one of the stops early in the ride, after draining my tank down a little, I dumped it all into the fuel tank. With the saddle bags packed to provide the inner structure, you can reef down on the side strips to the point where you can’t possibly pull the bottles out intentionally, much less need to worry about them bouncing out.

The rest of my gear was packed into the saddle bags and a dry bag. The dry bag was only necessary for the first day, carrying my shoes, tripod, some cloths and a few other things. Once all the water bladders were emptied, there was plenty of room in the saddle bag for everything including the extra rolled up dry bag.

Packing the bag and accessing it was simple enough. the compression sack for the sleeping bag really helps getting things packed efficiently. It was nice not to have to mess with zippers that stick or won’t pull closed due to the packing job and resulting shape of the bag. Rolling this bag closed is simple and secure. It wasn’t rain tested on this trip, but can’t imagine that it would be any less than 100% water tight due to its roll-top design.

Riding:

The White Rim is a fun, flowing ride. While, due to the exposure, you have to be 100% in control and not out-ride your sight, etc, this ride is really fun at a slightly brisk pace.

The most important thing for me to note here is that the luggage took nothing away from my enjoyment of the ride or slow me from a comfortable pace that I would otherwise have ridden. I never found myself thinking, “Oh this would be a great ride if it wasn’t for all this load I’m carrying…”. The bike handled great with a little extra preload on the rear shock and never felt overloaded.

Camping gear and fuel mostly carried in the saddle bags and tank bag (not shown: additional trail food for day 2):



Tools carried in the saddle bags and tank bag:



Tool bags as packed, along with clothes carried in the saddle bags and separate dry bag:



Items carried in my backpack plus the tripod carried in the dry bag:

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Old 05-27-2014, 06:53 PM   #424
haildamage
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kurtw View Post
HD:

This is a 2013 350 EXC-F. What a bike, huh!?




My lower straps are done as shown earlier in the thread. The fit is so good with no long run of webbing on this bike so I don't see anything to be concerned about with rubbing. On my 690, the run is longer and I thread the webbing through a piece of bicycle inner tube where it contacts the bodywork and frame to protect everything.







I did use an old GL heat shield that I had around since I hadn't yet received the Altrider one before I left. They both do the job. I felt it was necessary for this bike/bag combo.



Let's see it!
yes, i am coming from a DRZ to a 350 Six Days. this is my first high performance DS bike and wow, it is fantatsic. it really hurt the bank account but ridding it i feel it was worth every yennie!

thanks for the pics. i went down under the bottom of the of the subframe which is a bit worrying with the chain. i will have a look at moving it up to where you have it on the left side.

where can i get one of those neat D ring holder thingies you are using on the right side?!?

the tank bag looks great on your bike.
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Old 05-27-2014, 07:04 PM   #425
kurtw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haildamage View Post
yes, i am coming from a DRZ to a 350 Six Days. this is my first high performance DS bike and wow, it is fantatsic. it really hurt the bank account but ridding it i feel it was worth every yennie!

thanks for the pics. i went down under the bottom of the of the subframe which is a bit worrying with the chain. i will have a look at moving it up to where you have it on the left side.

where can i get one of those neat D ring holder thingies you are using on the right side?!?

the tank bag looks great on your bike.
HD, the D-Ring thingy is an insulated hose clamp from the hardware store (EXAMPLE). The 1 inch D-Ring (or round ring) should be available at a marine supply store, saddlery shop, or Amazon. Just make sure to get a welded one. (something like THIS, except you probably don't need 50....)
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Old 05-27-2014, 07:08 PM   #426
haildamage
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thanks for pointing me in the right direction kurtw!

will post up some pics after the camping trip. cant wait to test it all out!
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Old 05-28-2014, 05:26 AM   #427
Stu
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Backpack

Kurt,

Thanks for the post. The items you took with the explanation for your White Rim ride helps a lot. What backpack did you use? I've considered this:

http://www.kriega.us/r15-motorcycle-backpack/

since I do not want the backpack moving around and chafing my shoulders. I got painful ulcerations from slipping shoulder straps from another bag that I thought was correctly adjusted. (Apparently not....) This bag is short enough (about 17.2" high) that you could also wear your waist tool bag below it. My Ogio waist tool bag works very well. I don't notice it when riding and it gets the weight of the tools off the bike's load.

Stu
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Old 05-28-2014, 07:42 AM   #428
kurtw
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Stu, I was using a Klim Krew Pac, which is really a snow pack and ok but not ideal. I've been curious about those Kreiga packs for a long time.
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Old 05-28-2014, 08:56 AM   #429
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stu View Post
Kurt,

.......
http://www.kriega.us/r15-motorcycle-backpack/

since I do not want the backpack moving around and chafing my shoulders. I got painful ulcerations from slipping shoulder straps from another bag that I thought was correctly adjusted. (Apparently not....) This bag is short enough (about 17.2" high) that you could also wear your waist tool bag below it. My Ogio waist tool bag works very well. I don't notice it when riding and it gets the weight of the tools off the bike's load.

Stu
Apologies for the hijack .

Hey there Stu,

I've ridden with a few Kreiga products now and the one I have not had any issues with is the R15 (15 liters) backpack. It a nice small pack and the harness system is a godsend for people not wanting weight on their shoulders. Since it does not have a weight carrying hip belt it has no weight on the hips either. No weight on the hips and shoulders really feels wonderful for manhandling dirtbikes, a profound freedom of movement is provided. WITH ONE CAVEAT. The harness system cannot carry weight well so if you want to load it up it will not perform well or be comfortable. On my multi week/multi day DS rides I carry a 11" laptop, 3 liters of fluids and small things like headlamp, towstrap etc. and I don't want any more in it at all.



I'm a midget at 5'6" so use my size for pack size reference.

I loaded the pack with water bottles one time and the harness system carries all the weight on the sternum, pressing against your chest like a firm fist. Not bad if just cruising fireroads but I'd hate to be pushing, lifting and pulling bikes with that weight pushing in my sternum as I'm struggling to take deep breaths, it affected my breathing with the weight.

I also use it with the Kriega R3 fanny pack when gong out of the country and you can see how they fit together here:




No problem fitting a fanny pack even with my short stature.

It's so comfy i even use it on my day rides instead of my Klim hydration or Camelbaks.

End of hijack.


Back on topic Wachs Hemishere bag has landed on my doorstep so will throw it over the bike tomorrow and post some pics of everything.
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Old 05-28-2014, 09:44 AM   #430
Stu
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Backpack

Kurt, Justin,

Thanks for the replies. I would not want to carry heavy stuff in a backpack for long, just like you. The backpack, and the kube pocket (for a multitool and other trailside essentials you don't want to dig for), would take care of water, rain jacket, snacks and things you don't want to lose (registration, etc.). The new 9 to 11" notepads coming out soon will be powerful enough to run Photoshop so that would go in as well.

No hijack. I appreciate it. A backpack supplements the total that can be carried with Wach's new designs. For some travel requirements a backpack would be extremely handy. It looks like for all off-road excursions Wach's new systems will be ideal. I await your report, Justin!

Stu
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Old 05-28-2014, 10:09 AM   #431
cyborg
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kurtw View Post
Stu, I was using a Klim Krew Pac, which is really a snow pack and ok but not ideal. I've been curious about those Kreiga packs for a long time.
Great Altrider luggage pics from everyone!

Speaking of backpacks, I love my Kreiga R15 backpack. It would be a great companion to the Altrider luggage. My R15 has taken serious abuse for almost 5 years, technical trail to adventure riding. It's also quite rain proof too. IMHO the Kreiga chest harness is one of the best in the biz. The strap system never bothers me, even on really long offroad days. Has enough room for thin jackets liners, all your tech, tools, snacks, etc etc. I'm not a fan of the Kreiga bladder/hose system, so I use the 100-oz flatter-profile Hydrapack "shape shift" bladder and Camelback blue hose and mouth valves in the R15. Really like the flatter Hydrapack bladder to keep the backpack closer to the body.
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Old 05-29-2014, 07:34 AM   #432
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Like Cyborg above I don't use the Kriega supplied hydration bladder or hose. Instead i opted for a Camelbak antidote bladder that has a baffle providing a flatter bladder as does Cybogs linked bladder above. Pic of the difference in width size between the two 3 liter bladders.



This gives more efficient packing space in the small R15 pack.

Back to Altrider goodness. Had this show up on the door packed in a special "make it work for customs to look into what's in the $6 duffelbag package and charge me customs duties". Thanks heaps Wachs. As promised it had been dragged through the dirt.



opened the box and laid out the goodies.




Came with three items. 1. Holster



It retains the familiar Coyote shape with a few changes in the side pod area it looks like. It uses the same fastening system as used on his Coyote bags. Two clips fastened over the rear fender pulled into the widening taper of the rear fender by the lower pod webbing straps that are fastened around the lower subframe. In 5 years of using the Coyote I never had issues with them coming loose once battened down so I'm guessing this will provide the same reliable performance.

Hemisphere bag:



Same basic shape as the Coyote except extending taller. I see a lot of people strapping extra bags on their Coyotes so this mod will hopefully eliminate the need for going through that motion. The seam sealing on all the seams looked bomber and well done. Something I was happy and relieved to find out. it's basically a horseshoe shaped drybag. The number one complaint with most users of the Coyote was lack of waterproofing, this raises the bag and will keep us punters quiet on that front.

Sleeping bag compression sack:



This was a nice feature I was not anticipating. He has even shaped the compression sack to mimic the U shape of the Hemisphere and includes 3 built in Fastex buckles for compressing the bag. A nice addition.


Thrown on the bike ( KTM 500).




The Holster is made from bomber Corura material and the strap keepers sewn in allow the straps from flapping about as happened on earlier Coyote models.

Holsters waiting to be filled.



close up of the rear fender clips.



Place the bag on where you want it located and adjust the webbing to place the buckles where you need them.



More pics to come with the bike loaded.
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Old 05-29-2014, 08:04 AM   #433
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Since I live in South East Asia our weather here is temperature wise, pretty mild. This allows us to pack a bit more minimal than riders in other climates. Here's my rig set-up packed as I usually load over the last couple years.





Loaded into the bags are these items:

Left side
*double layer hammock, bug net, tarp and webbing straps
* 40F down quilts, top and bottom
* Clothes: pants, shorts, thermal top and bottom, 2 t-shirts, 2 undies and two pair of socks, down vest
* toiletry bag
In external pocket a pair of size 8 Chaco sandals

Right side
* two quarts of oil
* front and rear tube
* Water filter
* food
External pocket has 3 tire irons, Mtn bike pump and tool kit.

This is my go to pack kit for anything from 3 days to three weeks. The good news is that it all packed into the side pods pretty well without sticking much above the seat which is what I was hoping for. Unlike the Kriega Ovelrander 30's the Hemisphere does not foul the main part of the seat with a Camlock buckle. Here the bag is only cover the last inch of the seat so I can stretch out fully on any tarmac and keep the pressure spots rotating.





From the rear:



You can see my bike pump sticks out as does the top of the shoes. This was my first time packing some kit into the bag so hopefully going forward it will get a bit more efficient.

Here is the Kriega Overlander with the same kit.





In the above pic a smaller bivy sack and down quilt replaced the hammock/tarp set-up. The Bivy set-up packs a bunch smaller as you can imagine yet the Hemisphere swallowed the additional bulk of the hammock/tarp with the same below the seat convenience. Also with the Kriega Overlander 30 set-up the tool kit is carried in the rear fender tool kit bag and the shoes strapped onto the outside of the Kriega Overlander 30. What this reveals is that the side pods of the Hemisphere can hold more than the 15 liter bags of the Kriega overlander 30.

One thing to keep in mind is that once packed the Hemisphere does not just fall into the holster. It was my first time so hopefully future packings will have me a bit more efficient getting it into the holster. It's a bit like stuffing 5 pounds of shit into a 3 pound sack. Packing with it already instaalled into the holster would be easier. I may just never remove the bag from the holster as i have a fairly quick system for removing the whole bag. I'll get a video later.

Looking forward to trying this kit out on an overnight ride in a couple of days and will report back.

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Old 05-29-2014, 09:31 AM   #434
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ftb - Excellent write up and the pictures of the bag disassembled are very helpful!

I am really interested in switching from my GL Great Basin to the Hemisphere and I have two questions for anyone that can answer:

1. How does the Hemisphere compare size wise, in terms of storage in the waterproof portion of the bag to the GL Great Basin (~50L) that I currently have?

2. Any idea if the Hemisphere would be any more or less difficult than the GL to get the right leg of the bag out of the way for refueling my F800GS (filler located at the right rear of the seat)?
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Old 05-29-2014, 09:48 AM   #435
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Great write up FTB. Thanks for taking the time.


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