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Old 01-14-2014, 11:47 PM   #31
PeterW
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Nothing.


There are a lot of winding country roads around here 1-1/2 lane seal with gravel edges, occasionally a car will scoop gravel all over a corner - so - plenty of practice.

O.K. DL 650, K60's, so good bike, good tires for this. On the blind ones, or ones where I can see gravel early I'm also turning the bike early - wide in, aim to cut straight across the apex - so the bike isn't leaned over much on the gravel anyway. If it twitches, just relax, ride it out - there's essentially NO input into the controls from me at that point.

It seems to be lean angle as much as sliding that causes serious problems, basically because the bike tends to just fall down when the tires loose grip - hit the ground and it's pretty much all over - so having the turning mostly done before the possible gravel makes it much much easier to cope with.

And as others have said "Ride dirt" - if you were doing 50-60mph on hard packed gravel roads last weekend, then that little scatter on the corner is nothing.

Pete
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Old 01-15-2014, 01:21 AM   #32
ezrydr
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1. Lie there and say shit repeatedly.

2. Wait (usually not more than a few minutes) till old lady in Lincoln pulls up alongside you and says anxiously, "Did you fall?"

3. Say, "No, ma'am, I just grew this way."
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Old 01-15-2014, 04:58 AM   #33
ErikDK
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Originally Posted by manfromthestix View Post
This man knows what he's talking about. .............








Doug

I was taken out by chip sealing a couple of years ago.
They had put up ONE warning sign 1½ mile before and the truck had dumped all the chips in the last half of a sloping turn in a thick layer.

It was like riding on a carpet of ball bearings and I found myself sliding on my back, dragged forward by my left ankle wedged under my 600 lbs scooter, until it came to rest at the side of the road.

I kept honking my horn until a man came out of a nearby house and lifted the behemoth off my ankle.

Luckily I was ATGATT including heavy boots, otherwise I wouldn't have gotten away with only burst skin and a nasty wound infection.
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Old 01-15-2014, 05:44 AM   #34
randyo
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Originally Posted by Other Bob View Post
Nice picture Randyo!

Do you use any 'special' to protect your bike (particularly the electrical system) from the salt?

[snip]

P.S. S'not a hijack .. it is rock salt, after all!
originally, I did nothing and learned the hard way, all new wire harness and sensors on my V-strom 1000 cause of the cancer from winter riding

never had an issue with my old nekid 99SV, carbs are not sensitive to minute voltage fluxuations. The new harness on my Vee, all connections are doused in dielectic grease and wrapped with M33

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Old 01-15-2014, 06:01 AM   #35
Grinnin
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Where I live the paved roads can have sand and gravel across the intersections all year long. There's a tight banked turn very near here with gravel along the tire tracks and rain will always add sand/gravel stripes across the lanes. Riders here have to get used to it.

It kinda sucks that you live where gravel on pavement is so rare that you want to avoid it. Going out and practicing on iffy surfaces can make all riding more enjoyable.
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Old 01-15-2014, 06:10 AM   #36
max384
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I just ride a little slower and try not to lean the bike as much when gravel is on the road. I've never tried intentionally sliding the rear on a street bike. While I love doing that in the dirt, that just doesn't sound like much fun to me on the street.
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Old 01-15-2014, 04:41 PM   #37
bogey78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterW View Post
Nothing.


There are a lot of winding country roads around here 1-1/2 lane seal with gravel edges, occasionally a car will scoop gravel all over a corner - so - plenty of practice.

O.K. DL 650, K60's, so good bike, good tires for this. On the blind ones, or ones where I can see gravel early I'm also turning the bike early - wide in, aim to cut straight across the apex - so the bike isn't leaned over much on the gravel anyway. If it twitches, just relax, ride it out - there's essentially NO input into the controls from me at that point.

It seems to be lean angle as much as sliding that causes serious problems, basically because the bike tends to just fall down when the tires loose grip - hit the ground and it's pretty much all over - so having the turning mostly done before the possible gravel makes it much much easier to cope with.

And as others have said "Ride dirt" - if you were doing 50-60mph on hard packed gravel roads last weekend, then that little scatter on the corner is nothing.

Pete
^^This^^

Just don't do anything abrupt and the bike does what it normally does. If I see it in time, I will scrub off a little speed but then I release and ride the corner just like I would if nothing was there. If it doesn't work, a lowside happens and hopefully you get up with a scratched bike and no injuries.
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Old 01-15-2014, 05:48 PM   #38
Balootraveler
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Practice, relax, more practice....find a long gravel road you can ride for days like the dalton hwy have an adventure and get use to the feel of a loose surface.
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Old 01-15-2014, 08:38 PM   #39
jnclem
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It depends on whether my tires have been properly scuffed or not.
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Old 01-15-2014, 09:42 PM   #40
Other Bob
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Originally Posted by randyo View Post
originally, I did nothing and learned the hard way, all new wire harness and sensors on my V-strom 1000 cause of the cancer from winter riding

never had an issue with my old nekid 99SV, carbs are not sensitive to minute voltage fluxuations. The new harness on my Vee, all connections are doused in dielectic grease and wrapped with M33 ***
Ouch, expensive lesson - thanks for sharing the tip! Nice second picture too. I want to be there.

Many years ago I rode my beater Yamaha IT175 year round. On road, off road, on the frozen lake (after some snow froze to the ice!). There's not much wiring to harm on that bike, and at age 15'ish my grasp of the 'neglect/consequence' curve wasn't real firm anyway.

That juvenile handicap has thankfully faded, replaced by maturity which has unfortunately taken all the salty months of riding off my calender. Unacceptable - I am a man now, time to outsmart the salt and kill some cabin feaver!

Bob
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Old 01-15-2014, 10:05 PM   #41
Homey
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Originally Posted by Jacl-Kampuchea View Post
I keep going, I may give it more gas and enjoy the bike's drift.

The minute you try to stand it up, brake, adjust your line, whatever, you're attached to another object by an inclined plane, wrapped helically around an axis.
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Old 01-15-2014, 10:13 PM   #42
tkent02
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Originally Posted by Homey View Post

The minute you try to stand it up, brake, adjust your line, whatever, you're attached to another object by an inclined plane, wrapped helically around an axis.
X, Y, or Z?
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Old 01-16-2014, 07:23 AM   #43
randyo
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Originally Posted by Other Bob View Post
Ouch, expensive lesson - thanks for sharing the tip! Nice second picture too. I want to be there.

Many years ago I rode my beater Yamaha IT175 year round. On road, off road, on the frozen lake (after some snow froze to the ice!). There's not much wiring to harm on that bike, and at age 15'ish my grasp of the 'neglect/consequence' curve wasn't real firm anyway.

That juvenile handicap has thankfully faded, replaced by maturity which has unfortunately taken all the salty months of riding off my calender. Unacceptable - I am a man now, time to outsmart the salt and kill some cabin feaver!

Bob
not as expensive as it coulda been, for me, I have a unique relationship with my dealer, not only to I get 15% discount, I get 30 day terms AND as a Land Use Consultant, I do a fair amount of work for the owner of the dealership, so we do barters as well. The barters is where I really make out, for work they do for me, it's 75/hr minus the 15% discount = $63.75/hr, meanwhile my charge rate to him is $125/hr.
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Old 01-16-2014, 07:50 AM   #44
manfromthestix
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Originally Posted by max384 View Post
I just ride a little slower and try not to lean the bike as much when gravel is on the road. I've never tried intentionally sliding the rear on a street bike. While I love doing that in the dirt, that just doesn't sound like much fun to me on the street.
I beg to disagree, sir! Check out some serious fun being had here by Ruben Xaus on a Ducati supermotard:



Google "Casey Stoner powerslide" for some really cool shots of a master...

I just get a woody looking at stuff like that. Talk about skill! It helps to have a super hot bike and team of mechanics behind you too, but that's a lot of skill on display there. I aspire to ride like that some day.

I was having some work done on my BMW RT at Northern Colorado BMW/Ducati (Fort Collins) several years ago during the "off-season" and the shop manager told me that about 75% of their Winter work was repairing damage done from people taking spills on road sand/gravel/salt residue. He said that whenever a nice day happened along the Front Range folks would get their bikes out for a spin, get the "yips" and start hanging corners and over-using the throttle and down they'd go. He thought all the sand was a good thing for his business , and it helps with car traction as a side benefit.

Ride safely, watch the lean angle and throttle, and you'll be fine.

Doug
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Old 01-17-2014, 08:53 AM   #45
Uncle Pollo
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Originally Posted by Skyshadow View Post
Suck it up and get used to it, learn where it occurs and anticipate it. Some bikes handle better than others on the stuff. Just don't go in with too much lean or too hot. With climate change you are going to be dealing with a lot more than before.
Best bike for that: k1200lt

that thing would not be bothered by gravel
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