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Old 01-20-2014, 10:35 PM   #16
gaahrdner OP
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If it's not clear I was way faster and more confident at the end of that video lol.
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Old 01-20-2014, 11:07 PM   #17
hanksmybuddy
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Subscribed to this one.

Rented a bike from Dan Dickie up in Tenn a couple of years ago. Salt of the earth. Loaned me his truck to go to dinner and was a great help in giving me local advice where to ride for 4 days. Bike I rented from him, Yamaha Tenere, was set up nice and a pleasure to cruise around on. Would highly recommend him if you need to rent a bike, shoot the shit or drink a cold one with.

Dan at his shop in Tenn.......


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Old 01-27-2014, 06:41 PM   #18
gaahrdner OP
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Pre-Mexico Week, Or How I Just Lazed About In Hotels

Been a while, here's an update; tomorrow, Baja.

I’m currently in Yuma, and tomorrow I’ll be headed to Calexico/Mexicali to cross over into Baja. I’ve been living in the lap of hotel luxury here and taking care of a few maintenance issues as well. Seriously, the hotel gives you free beer at 5PM every day. But I suppose I owe a bit of an update for the last week, however boring it might be.

So, following Big Bend, Curt and I decided to ride together to El Paso, via Route 170 (a.k.a. “River Road”), which is easily one of the best motorcycling roads out there. Turn after turn greets you as you ride along the Rio Grande, encountering elevation drops as you pass through Lajitas and Presidio, eventually turning north to meet I-10, or, continuing on to Mexico. Curt was headed to San Diego to attempt an Iron Butt challenge, entitled “50cc,” whereby you ride coast to coast in 50 hours or less. If it sounds insane, that’s because it is; hopefully he’s made it! Anyway, a few photos from River Road:


View from the highest point of River Road. Note all the rocks from rock slides.


This was at the top of a 15% gradient, great view.

Great ride, but we couldn’t take it all the way so headed north on 67, back to Marfa. Somehow I just can’t escape that town. On the way towards the highway, we passed a random Prada store, in the middle of nowhere. Pretty wild, and apparently an art installation.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prada_Marfa

Other than that, a pretty uneventful (and longish, ~340 miles) ride to El Paso where we crashed for the night in a Red Roof Inn. And I finally got to take a glorious shower.

The next day, I was keen to check out White Sands, for god knows what reason, and Curt figured he’d ride along too, having never been. The ride into New Mexico was extremely boring, just the straightest flattest road you’ve ever seen, the only saving grace being the extreme cold I experienced. An hour in I could barely feel my hands, the temperatures having dropped 20 degrees and the wind picking up as we approached the Sacramento mountains. I eventually had to stop at some random gas station, warm up my frozen digits over a hot dog warming machine and put on my winter gloves for the first time. Curt, being from Iowa, had his handy electric heated vest, and was quite content. Bastard.

Anyway, we eventually made it to White Sands, and wow, it’s fairly incredible. You ride in to the Tularoa basin, and in the middle are these massive gypsum dunes, the largest in the world. It’s very fine stuff, and can probably damage your electrical equipment, though, not as dangerous to cameras as Whitehaven Beach sand (p.s. I miss Australia).


Crusted gypsum on my rims. It would last for days.


Taken from about 30 feet up on some dunes.



After an hour or so of riding around, Curt and I split up. He wanted to see Death Valley before attempting his ride, and I decided to go see Roswell, NM.

How silly of me.

The ride to Roswell, while only 140 miles or so (and scenic), crawls through the Sierra Blanca mountains, passing by a number of Native American owned casinos. This is Apache land, and I find it odd that, while you pass by Tribal Bureau’s, you see scores of churches jutting up from the mountainsides. The worst part is the wind, and the cold. The wind races down the mountains, and as I ride from valley to valley the little DR650 is constantly subjected to gusts; the “strong crosswinds” signs are (again) no joke.

I eventually make it to Roswell, and…everything is closed. MLK day of course, even proprietors of alien artifacts take the day off. Cursing my poor decision I rent a decent room at a very affordable rate, debate my windy ride out the next day, and pass out. Skip Roswell if you’re ever in the neighborhood, that’s my advice. I did grab a nice breakfast at the Cowboy Cafe, and spotted this sweet truck.


Classy.

The next day I’m determined to make some time and head to Tucson, non-stop. I rode and rode and rode, maybe some 500 miles or so, it was fairly uneventful. I will mention that I have never driven or ridden through so many Border Patrol checkpoints. At one point I turned off the highway (my GPS was set to avoid them) right before a checkpoint and was greeted not less than a mile down the road by two Border Patrol trucks, one blocking my lane and one on the shoulder. The agent put out his hand, and I guess I’ll never know if he was waving to me as a greeting, or to pull me over, because I was ~350 miles into my trip, the sun was setting, and I just blasted right by them. Maybe I’m on some list now?



Eventually ended up in Tucson, where I spent a day or two just sleeping, I hadn’t been feeling well as it was. I really contemplated going north to see the Grand Canyon, then through Vegas and Pahrump to Death Valley to see the stars, but, damnit, I was so tired of the cold so I decided to put on my new tires and head towards Yuma before crossing into Mexico.

I found a place a few miles north of my hotel, on the way towards Yuma who would spoon the tires on, and waited around a few hours for the task to be completed.



When it was done, well, they had a bit of surprise for me.


Well, that’s not right.

Apparently I had lost both rear caliper pins. These hold the brake pads in place, and would explain the sponginess I had been feeling the last day or two. I have no idea how they were lost; maybe they were never installed? Maybe someone took them (why)? Who knows. Ride Now wasn’t going to be able to get them ordered until Tuesday though (it being a Friday), so, I was out of luck.

Except. I had noticed a brand new DR650 out front, and after a few minutes and some cajoling asked, perhaps they could let me have those pins, and just add the new ones to my bill? Surely you don’t sell that many (they had just sold one last week). Well, an hour later, after going through the chain of command, the answer was yes, and they didn’t even charge me overnight shipping! Fantastic!


Lucas at RideNow Ina, helping a brother out.

A few minutes later I was on my way, and then a few hours later, I’m in Yuma. I booked a room at the Clarion Suites, and grabbed a meal. Seriously though, this hotel is amazing. They give you two free adult beverages at 5PM everyday, the rooms are huge and only $70. What a country.

A quick note on Yuma, and southwest Arizona in general though. Never have I felt more unsafe riding around than in this city, and in this general area. The roads are filled with AARP members and Canadians, all hell-bent on driving their trucks in the slowest and most erratic manner possible, often just cutting across lanes, or pulling out of side streets with nary a glance to surrounding traffic. It must be the heat. It's enough to a drive a man insane, and I've thrown curses from behind my matte black helmet multiple times a day. I spoke with my mom (hi mom) and she mentioned that apparently, as a youth, it was a possibility we would have perhaps lived in this god awful place. Can you imagine? I'm certain I would have shot someone due to road rage by now. Seriously, I'm sure some anti-Arabic jingoistic zealots may disagree with me, but the next time you're in a conversation and someone offers up the "nuke 'em into glass" argument towards some Middle Eastern country, consider proffering Yuma as an alternative. We could easily relocate everyone who's visiting and living here first, perhaps to Oman.

I digress.

Tomorrow I go to Baja.

Satphone is activated.


I paid -$200 for this phone.

I’ve got a handy card for the amazing people I’m going to meet.


I HAVE ALL THE KOALIFICATIONS.

And I just saw “Lone Survivor,” so I’m feeling pretty pumped up about this whole adventure.

My god, the septuagenarians are here for their free beer. It’s about time to wrap this post up, it’s going to get rowdy.

Full post with links because I'm not relinking everything at: http://phileasabroad.com/pre-mexico-week/

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Old 02-03-2014, 08:58 PM   #19
gaahrdner OP
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Into Baja

Hey peeps, I'm in Guerrero Negro right now, and a few days behind on posting. Tomorrow I'm headed towards San Ignacio, and maybe Mulege, but here's an update if anyone is still reading this.

I crossed over into Baja through a border town whose name changes depending on what side of the border you're on; in the U.S.A. it's Calexico, south of the border it's Mexicali. Either way, it's what I imagine your typical border town is like; auto parts store and mini marts abound, and on the U.S. side multiple insurance companies dot the road leading to the crossing, a reminder that a policy is required lest you kill some poor sap.

Crossing the border couldn't have been easier, the Mexican migración officers just wave you on by and then there you are, in Mexico. Immediately you're greeted by rows and rows of farmacias on either side of the street (clearly for the medical vacationing gringo, and probably with gringo prices to boot), with the occasional drug addict (or maybe just a drunk) sat down on a street curb as taxi fleets consisting of what appears to be 1998 Mitsubishi Galants flit by, ever honking their horns in an attempt to pick up pedestrians.


Need some viagra?

I however, have other plans; in my prior research I found that, while you don't need a tourist visa to hang out in Baja, you do need one should you cross to the mainland, and it's a bit of a hassle to get one in La Paz (where the ferry departs from) so one may as well get one here, in Mexicali. I drive around the block a few times looking for some sort of "Migración" sign but, nada, and eventually stop at what appears to be a government building to ask where I can get my TVIP. Sadly, my naiveté has already gotten the better of me, as the four government employees have no idea what the hell I'm talking about. Eventually I get out of them that I need to head to the airport, which is about 20 miles away.



Of course, once I get to the airport, I quickly realize I have misunderstood these hombres; what I meant to understand was that the bureaucratic office I need was on the way to the airport, so I turn back around and head back towards Mexicali. There's another border crossing east of the city, with scores of eighteen wheelers waiting to enter into the U.S. I ride past them, find the correct office, and begin the process of getting a tourist visa, which goes something like this:
  1. Go to a small building for vehicle importations, and learn that you need a tourist visa.
  2. Go to another building that handles tourist visas, and get your passport stamped, and a bill.
  3. Go back to the first building and pay for your visa.
  4. Return to the tourist visa office, and retrieve your passport.
  5. Go back to the first building that issues temporary vehicle importation passes, pay a refundable $400 deposit and receive your papers, and you're on your way!
  6. Marvel at the efficiency of the Mexican bureaucracy, and ponder how many more steps there will be the further south you go.



This happened as well:

Quote:
"Is gaahrdner your name?", the female officer asked me.

"Si."

"Oh that won't do", she said, smiling, " you are in Mexico now, you need a Mexican name."

"Oh, like...Phil..."

"No like Felipe, or Feliverte", she giggled.

"Ahh si, Felipe. Wait, Feliverte? I never heard of that name before. Why is that funny?"

"It's just funny"
I still have no idea why.

Anyway, paperwork was in order, and it was time to mosey down to San Felipe, a desert town on the Sea of Cortez. Not sure what to expect, I took the MEX 5 south, a two hour journey through increasingly rural areas. The roads are well-paved, if not boringly straight. There were some sights, though I didn't manage to get as many pictures as I wanted as I was still struggling with all my camera gear.


This wrecked plane was piloted by Denzel Washington, and most everyone survived. Honestly I was a bit surprised to see a random plane on the side of the road.


The view for two hours, interrupted by trucks and Pemex stations every once in a while.


So much road.

Eventually I wearily pulled into San Felipe, and scouted for hotels. With names like El Capitan and El Cortez, I settled on a particularly Mexican joint named Caribe Hotel, that had a courtyard where I could secure my motorcycle.




I sadly did not spend a lot of time in San Felipe, and in hindsight I should have spent a day exploring. You ride into town through the main road, with small grocery stores and mechanic shops lining the streets until you reach the Malecon (boardwalk), and the Sea of Cortez. On the Malecon are the majority of restaurants, and when I say majority I mean maybe ten to fifteen; so far I've had to reevaluate what I believe "a lot" or "large city" mean with regards to my worldview.

Anyway, here's a typical room you'll get for 500 pesos.


My First Mexican Hotel Room®

I crashed pretty hard, had some huevos rancheros the next morning, and headed towards Puertocitos.


Huevos Rancheros, it means Eggs Rancheros.
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Old 02-03-2014, 09:13 PM   #20
K_N_Fodder
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I'm in, brother. Don't listen to a thing Hanksmybuddy sez. Are you on TWT? Those guys would lap this up.

Justin
(in Wyoming, from Bend... from Austin...)
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Old 02-03-2014, 10:08 PM   #21
gaahrdner OP
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I'm in, brother. Don't listen to a thing Hanksmybuddy sez. Are you on TWT? Those guys would lap this up.

Justin
(in Wyoming, from Bend... from Austin...)
Oh damn, I totally am, forgot about that site!
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Old 02-03-2014, 11:26 PM   #22
gaahrdner OP
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Baja Crash

Here's me crashing in Baja, it was rad! Sadly it took me like 2 hours to upload this video, so, I don't know when I'll be able to upload the rest. Maybe in Cabo?

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Old 02-06-2014, 01:55 PM   #23
gaahrdner OP
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San Felipe to Gonzaga Bay

Eager to see the ‘real’ Baja, I awoke at a blisteringly early 10AM, shoveled some huevos rancheros into my mouth and hopped onto the MEX5 south towards Puertocitos.

MEX5 is littered with good ideas shot dead by the recession. Worn billboards line the roads, their sun-faded lettering extolling the latest and greatest parcels of land for sale, or a new hotel opening up last spring.



The road, as well, quickly becomes a bit rougher, ever present sand dunes continuing their steady march more and more inland. It’s still completely drivable of course (and easily), I mention it merely because some Americans more used to the highways of our country might be in for a bit of surprise.



The ride is mostly uneventful, though I have my first experience with vados, the Mexican solution to road floods. While Baja is extremely arid, it does rain at times, and the area is known to flood during high rainfall (as was the case in 2012 with Hurricane Paulie Cicero). So what the Mexicans have done, is create dips in the road that allow the water to flow towards lower elevations.

These can be properly terrifying when they are not marked, and they are often not (though more times they are on major thoroughfares), and will work your suspension over like a fat man on a pogo stick. Luckily, local gringos will often take matters into their own hands to warn fellow travelers of upcoming vados.


This was one was proceeded by a 10 foot “OH” sign as well.

I continued on, through the desert scrub that makes up this land. The mind can play tricks on you at times, as the road is very straight and the surrounding area begins to look a bit alien to a traveller, but a quick glance towards the coastline and, sanity regained, you’ll see many homes that have been built by locals and gringos.


Houses in the distance, though I explored some and found many abandoned.

Eventually I made it to Puertocitos, well, at least the outskirts, and came across this sign, and, while taking pictures, was stopped by a gringo curious about my motorcycle.


Every gringo who lives in the area, I assume.

“You long distance riders are crazy man, where are you going?” I told him my short story so far, and he mentioned I should stop at a place called Cowpatty’s for a “beer and hotdog.” Only in Baja. Feeling peckish, I decided, what the hell. A mile later, I’m at the cow shit bar.


His logo is a Mexican with a massive sombrero and accompanying mustache.

There’s a lot to look at it, and judging by the race team stickers appears to be a pretty popular place on the Baja 1000 circuit.

sadly i can't import this photo gallery to the forum

I find the owner (Richard), tending bar, order a beer and a dog and we start conversating. He tells me that there’s not much to see in Puertocitos, and I should keep riding as it’s only 1PM and I can easily make it to Gonzaga Bay, a much prettier place with a store (a store!). He also tells me a bit about the place, how he’s planning on having a Super Bowl party here and that I should definitely not stay here because everyone is an old gringo. As if on cue, they start filtering in from their surrounding beach homes for a mid-day beer and some conversation.

One thing I have noticed is that these transplants are a tight knit group and not keen on carrying on conversations with travellers, unlike the locals. I’m not sure if it’s due to a generational divide or the climate, or perhaps something else, but it reminds me of the Portland Freeze. Anyway, I pay Richard, leave him a tip, and head out towards Gonzaga Bay, passing through Puertocitos for some gas. He was right, there really is not much there (apparently some hot springs but those are everywhere), but it’d be nice for a day trip I’m sure.



The road to Gonzaga Bay is much more interesting.

While paved, it begins to snake through the Sierra de San Pedro Mártir Peninsular Range, a feature I was not expecting when I first rode into Baja. Along the way volcanic rocks jut through the Sea of Cortez, defiant through the ages as always.


Excitingly, my friend Mr. High Brown Pants Moment Crosswinds has decided to join me as well, so I don’t have too many pictures of the ride towards the Bay. The sun was setting as well, and I was not relishing the possibility of riding at night in high wind traffic. No sir.






As luck would have it, the road ends, due to construction. It turns out, the MEX5 is still under construction, and past Gonzaga Bay it’s all offroad until you rejoin with the MEX1 further central to Baja. It’s also here that there exists a military checkpoint. Because why wouldn’t there be a checkpoint on a dirt road?



I eventually get to Gonzaga Bay, which is nothing more than a crescent of sand, a Pemex gas station, and a store/restaurant. Numerous fishing vessels sit offshore, as Gonzaga is a small fishing village, though these are clearly commercial and I’m not sure where they dock.


Gonzaga Bay and fishing vessels.

On the beach I camp under a palapa, which has the exorbitant price of 250 pesos for wind protection, or 120 without. I opt for with, and damn, I sure am glad I do.


A palapa.

It’s been a long day, so I eat some tacos at the store, head back to the beach with few cervezas, and am treated to a nice sunset over the bay.



And then the wind picks up to about 50mph.

I huddle in my tent as the sand begins to pile up inside the palapa and around the tent, finishing off my cervezas and listening to some tunes. I’m pretty thankful I went for the wind barrier, I can’t imagine what my night would have been like in that weather without it.

gaahrdner screwed with this post 02-06-2014 at 02:00 PM
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Old 02-06-2014, 04:03 PM   #24
adventurebound9517
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So far, so good. I'm in. I have forgotten how many of these RR to TDF I have read, there all good. Good luck and ride safe.

Phillip
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Old 02-06-2014, 05:26 PM   #25
TUCKERS
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Nice report.
You've got some great discoveries to make, you are going to have a blast!

We JUST gotback from tdf, our ride report is 'tuckers to tdf', you may be able to use some info from it for reference and guide, but it's so much fun to just GO and discover stuff for yourself.

You are wise to take the Topo ferry instead of the Mazatlan one. Much less expensive, much shorter, and you get to ride your bike through some jungle!

Our DR's served us well. We had 16 tooth front and 42 rear and got just over 200 miles out of our Acerbis tanks. You are going to need a one gallon gas can...trust me on this...get one now.

Apart from the spark plugs on Colleen's bike we had zero issues. never used a drop of oil between changes. I lubed and adjusted the chains regular, well lube anyway, adjustment was just four times in 12,000 miles. I changed the oil 4 times in each bike, I had 8 filters with me so I just spaced it out.

You can probably lighten your load. We found we needed very little. I'd say tools and spares were most of my load. Minimal clothes...when I needed something I just bought it.

Watch your speed, if you have OEM 15/42 sprockets 70 mph indicated on your speedo (not gps) is plenty fast enough. We just changed the GPS to kilometers and stuck to the speed limits, it makes it such a pleasure not to be dodging the PO PO.
Speaking of which...not stopping was a good idea you did. That's how we rolled, we just didn't stop for people with their hand out and whatever...we figured if they want us we'll know soon enough.

If you have any questions OF US, DON,T HESITATE TO ASK. If we can help we will.
__________________
James and Colleen Tucker.
Aut viam inveniam aut faciam
DMV work/insurance/registration/titles/address use/room rental/motorbike&vehicle buying/travelers help/problems solved

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Old 02-06-2014, 06:47 PM   #26
James Adams
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Old 02-06-2014, 07:54 PM   #27
gaahrdner OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adventurebound9517 View Post
So far, so good. I'm in. I have forgotten how many of these RR to TDF I have read, there all good. Good luck and ride safe.

Phillip
Hey thanks for tuning in, and, we share the same name so bonus points for us!
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Old 02-06-2014, 08:14 PM   #28
gaahrdner OP
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Nice report.
You,ve got some great discoveries to make, you are going to have a blast!

We JUST gotback from tdf, our report is tuckers to tdf, youmay be able touse some info from it for reference and guide, but it,s so much fun to just GO and discover stuff for yourself.
Hey Tuckers! Yep your ride report is amazing, I haven't read all of it but I've gleaned some ideas from it, and it's definitely been an inspiration. Especially glad it's a recent ride report as well. Glad to hear you guys made it back alright!

Quote:
Originally Posted by TUCKERS View Post
You are wise to take the Topo ferry instead of the Mazatlan one. Much less expensive, much shorter, and you get to ride your bike through some jungle!
This is great news. I was a bit worried since it's farther north in "cartel country" as some gringos here in Mulege have called it, but I really don't relish riding along a ferry for 18 hours. That said, I'm not married to the idea, so I'll just wing it when I eventually get to La Paz. Topo is still first on the list though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TUCKERS View Post
Our DR,,s served us well. We had 16 tooth front and 42 rear and got just over 200 miles out of our acerbis tanks. You are going to need a one gallon gas can...trust me on this...get one now.

Apart from the spark plugs on Colleen,s bike we had zero issues. never used a drop of oil between changes. I lubed and adjusted the chains regular, well lube anyway, adjustment was just four times in 12,000 miles. I changed the oil 4 times in each bike, I had 8 filters with me so I just spaced it out.
Yeah, so far I've had zero issues since sussing out the valves and missing washers in Terlingua. So far, with my 5.3 gallon Acerbis gallon (did you see they have a 6.6 gallon tank now!? damnit!) I was getting 168 miles before hitting reserve. This was with the additional weight of tires and running 87 octane with 10% ethanol from the states. I feel like I'm getting better gas mileage now with the Mexican gas, so probably close to 200? I have a camp stove that runs off of multifuel, and I've kept the bottle full of gas as well, so i figured that might work for emergency, but you seem pretty insistent on the 1 gallon extra, so maybe I'll see if I can find a super portable one.

My Scotoiler seems to be working great so far so I haven't even worried about chain maintenance. Makes me wonder if I should ship back that extra chain I'm lugging around. Carrying an extra sprocket as well, so maybe that could go too. Definitely all things I'd like to get sorted out in Cabo San Lucas, where it'll probably be cheaper/easier/gringo-ier to ship back. Carrying some spare spark plugs and my oil filter is that stainless steel jobbie, so fingers crossed!

Quote:
Originally Posted by TUCKERS View Post
You can probably lighten your load. We found we needed very little. I,d say tools and spares were most of my load. Minimal clothes...when I needed something i just bought it.
I've actually been agonizing over this for the past few days, but I'm just really not sure what else I can get rid of as I'm planning on staying in some places for a week or two. And to think, I agonized that I left behind my scuba gear!

Did you take camping gear? Mine's all contained in a 65L dry bag, considering shipping it back after Baja as I'm not sure how much I'll be camping, but I'd really hate to be without it in an emergency. I think I probably have a bit less stuff than you, weight wise at least, as I have soft panniers, and not the metal ones y'all had.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TUCKERS View Post
Watch your speed, if you have OEM 15..42 sprockets 70 mph indicated on your speedo not gps is plenty fast enough. We just changed the GPS to kilometers and stuck to the speed limits, it makes it such a pleasure not to be dodging the PO PO.
Speaking of which...not stopping was a good idea you did. That,s how we rolled, we just didn,t stop for people with their hand out and whatever...we figured if they want us we,ll know soon enough.
OEM for me with a spare 14 tooth in case of gnarly stuff, but it might be overkill. I definitely have been speeding along at 70 mph here in Baja, mostly because I'm still getting passed. Usually I'm crusing at 65, it gets real buzzy (as I'm sure you know) over 70mph indicated.

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If you have any questions OF US, DON,T HESITATE TO ASK. If we can help we will.
Will do, thanks!
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Old 02-06-2014, 08:17 PM   #29
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The Road To Coco's Corner

Video of my ride to Coco's Corner, only 3 minutes long or so. I had to wait 3 hours in a bar, drinking beers, eating some ribs, and talking to some German girls while I waited for this to upload. It was so difficult for me.

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Old 02-06-2014, 11:39 PM   #30
TUCKERS
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We carried camping gear all the way and never used it, not even once in 77 days and 12,000 miles.

We carried a spare chain and sprockets....never used them.

We carried front and rear spare inner tubes, never used them and never had one flat! I used the air pump once, I did change a front tire, so got to use my irons too.

I think things like shoes are a pain. I ended up with just my riding boots and a pair of Keens.

I had too many shirts. 3 T shirts is plenty. I was given two cotton ones later.

I had one pair of long nylon pants for off bike use and one pair of swim type shorts.

I used an electric vest on the bike, but had a woolen sweater for off bike use and a nylon wind breaker. The nylon clothing is great. I never travel with denim jeans.

Two pairs of gloves. summer and rain.


We did use our cooking gear, it saved us a ton of money.

If you don't get a gas can keep a 2 liter soda bottle and fill it with gas at your gas stop. As soon as you have used 2 liters of gas pour in the extra and dump the bottle. I'd get a gas can.
There are places when there is no gas for over 200 miles. Plus another trap we fall in to is "I've just filled up, I've only used less than a gallon"..so we whizz past the station...only to find the next one is 200 miles away and you have 160 miles range left!
We never/ever turned our gas off on the bikes. We both had dual taps and I just left them on reserve since I fitted them. We used the odo for gas mileage..I zero it out at every stop. It's the best way for me. I know exactly how many miles I have left that way. You should get 180 with the 15/42......never pass a gas station...even if you just need a half gallon.....it's a great way to take a pee, meet people.
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James and Colleen Tucker.
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DMV work/insurance/registration/titles/address use/room rental/motorbike&vehicle buying/travelers help/problems solved
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