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Old 01-25-2014, 01:38 PM   #31
Soldier311
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Now THAT is a nice bike! 1,200 cc, 120 hp....all without looking like a fat pig. Please bring 'em to the US.
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Originally Posted by Flyinace1 View Post
+1

My personal idea of a perfect "adventure" bike would be mostly street oriented but capable of some light offroading much like the Moto Morini Scrambler. I know it's quite different than most people's, but I love traveling on roads and highways and do very little to no offroading on my adventures



But since they don't sell them here...
If I had the time and money I'd get a naked mid-weight street bike with some decent torque down low, increase the suspension travel, bigger wheel on front, a few other mods to protect the bike and my hands and put on some road oriented dual sport tires so I can put on some serious road miles but still take on fire roads and easy trails when I feel the call
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Old 01-27-2014, 05:14 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by Qaz View Post
I have been reading these builds for about a year and like everyone else, I think: Man that is a good idea or I wouldn't do that. Let's face it, the BMW GS is a street bike and although the old Yamaha DT 250 was hell of a trailbike, it was limited on the road! As you move up in size and cc there should be a point where it all balances. The Versys and V-strom are good starting points but the KLR with the 650 twin engine offers more.
My question is: If you were to build frankenstien, what would it include and why? I think we need some guide lines, it must be capable of 200+ miles on a tank of gas, comfortable enough to ride 600+ mile days strung together (ie. Touring), keep up with highway traffic, nimble enough to ride single track.
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Originally Posted by BanjoBoy View Post
ADV ain't in the bike, it's in the rider!!!
Precisely!!!
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Old 01-27-2014, 05:28 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by FotoTEX View Post
For me, having a BMW on it makes a great DS bike. A large one that is. Like a R1200GS.
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Old 01-27-2014, 06:06 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BanjoBoy View Post
ADV ain't in the bike, it's in the rider!!!


Harkens back to a time when there were just motorcycles and you didn't care which pigeon hole it came from,

Edit - embedded instead of linked.

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Old 01-28-2014, 12:34 PM   #35
Qaz OP
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It does harken back to the day when a motorcycle was a do all machine, but the R1 is not one of them! That was just a stunt, kind of like when a person hunts dangerous game with a bow.
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Old 01-28-2014, 03:07 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by Qaz View Post
It does harken back to the day when a motorcycle was a do all machine, but the R1 is not one of them! That was just a stunt, kind of like when a person hunts dangerous game with a bow.
If you knew much about Mr. Sjaak I don't believe you would call it a stunt. He likes the performance provided by large displacement sport bikes and is willing to make sacrifices in some areas in order to ride the kind of bike he enjoys.

It all started with a 6 month trip to Australia in the mid '90s on a Honda 900 Fireblade that turned into a three year tour of forty countries.


He didn't get the R1 until five years later and that's been his ride of choice ever since. Almost twenty years doing just a stunt.

What prevents an R1 from being a do all machine beyond the limits of the rider's imagination? It has two wheels, a reliable engine, a seat, and handlebars. Modify it a bit to handle a load and off you go. It may not offer the comfort of a GS 1200 but not everybody needs or wants a comfy couch.

Somebody says they are taking their HD up to the Arctic Circle and nobody blinks an eye.



The same person (minus the pirate costume) says they're riding an R1 up the Dempster Highway and people call it a stunt.

Let's see, same fuel capacity, half the weight, larger diameter rear tire, same ground clearance, and $10,000 cheaper.

Edit - An R1 with 100 pounds of gear is still lighter than an empty BMW R 1200 GS Adventure.

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Old 01-29-2014, 09:03 AM   #37
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The time taken to do the stunt, be it ten minutes or ten years, makes it no less of a stunt. When the R1 is modified to make it more suitable for the adverse conditions for RTW, (ie. bars, tires ect..) it takes the narrow focus of the R1 away so that it is no longer an R1! Personally, I love seeing people use a motorcycle that was not designed for the purpose of RTW, use it for such. Riding a Harley to the Artic circle is not the same thing as riding the Dempster on a R1.
My hat is off to Mr. Sjaak and I will now read more about his exploits.
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Old 01-29-2014, 10:49 AM   #38
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Old 01-29-2014, 03:00 PM   #39
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For me the pigeon holes differentiating Dual Sport and Adventure bikes are separated where single track gets steep and unpaved double-track begins.

IMHO, the ADV bike is the one to comfortably pound out hours in the saddle, day after day, carrying what you need along. The ADV bike is prepared to rough it at a moments notice. It can have its arm twisted to do single track, but because it is a pig in comparison to something like a DRZ or KLR single it will never be able to perform as well there. ADV bikes will not be thumpers.

The Dual Sport won't like long days on the slab making time between exploring jeep tracks and mountain passes as much as an ADV bike will. Sure, you can do it, but it can be harder on the engine and not as comfortable in those situations where the ability to move a little more mass and employ more horsepower are desired. Dual Sports will mostly be mono-cylinderic.

You can go around the world having an adventure on either flavor, just depends on which blades you want to have at the ready on your Swiss Army Knife of a motorcycle.

It will be a challenge full of compromise to settle on a single bike that does it all. Possibly resulting in a ride that fits in neither pigeon hole as well as you might have hoped it would.
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Old 01-29-2014, 03:39 PM   #40
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Originally Posted by MotoTex View Post
For me the pigeon holes differentiating Dual Sport and Adventure bikes are separated where single track gets steep and unpaved double-track begins.

IMHO, the ADV bike is the one to comfortably pound out hours in the saddle, day after day, carrying what you need along. The ADV bike is prepared to rough it at a moments notice. It can have its arm twisted to do single track, but because it is a pig in comparison to something like a DRZ or KLR single it will never be able to perform as well there. ADV bikes will not be thumpers.

The Dual Sport won't like long days on the slab making time between exploring jeep tracks and mountain passes as much as an ADV bike will. Sure, you can do it, but it can be harder on the engine and not as comfortable in those situations where the ability to move a little more mass and employ more horsepower are desired. Dual Sports will mostly be mono-cylinderic.

You can go around the world having an adventure on either flavor, just depends on which blades you want to have at the ready on your Swiss Army Knife of a motorcycle.

It will be a challenge full of compromise to settle on a single bike that does it all. Possibly resulting in a ride that fits in neither pigeon hole as well as you might have hoped it would.
Very well said, sir!
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Old 01-30-2014, 01:40 AM   #41
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The perfect bike for an adventure is the one you have. People have gone adventure riding on anything with 2 wheels!

Ride more. Think about riding less.

Hell, If I weren't at work, I'd be either riding, eating or sleeping right now!
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Old 01-30-2014, 06:47 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MotoTex View Post
IMHO, the ADV bike is the one to comfortably pound out hours in the saddle, day after day, carrying what you need along. The ADV bike is prepared to rough it at a moments notice. It can have its arm twisted to do single track, but because it is a pig in comparison to something like a DRZ or KLR single it will never be able to perform as well there. ADV bikes will not be thumpers.

The Dual Sport won't like long days on the slab making time between exploring jeep tracks and mountain passes as much as an ADV bike will. Sure, you can do it, but it can be harder on the engine and not as comfortable in those situations where the ability to move a little more mass and employ more horsepower are desired. Dual Sports will mostly be mono-cylinderic.

You can go around the world having an adventure on either flavor, just depends on which blades you want to have at the ready on your Swiss Army Knife of a motorcycle.

It will be a challenge full of compromise to settle on a single bike that does it all. Possibly resulting in a ride that fits in neither pigeon hole as well as you might have hoped it would.
Very good, the only thing left out is the light end, like the KTM dual sports. I would further split your Dual Sport into 2 ranges:

Quote:
Originally Posted by What I said MotoTex should've said
IMHO, the ADV bike is the one to comfortably pound out hours in the saddle, day after day, carrying what you need along. The ADV bike is prepared to rough it at a moments notice. It can have its arm twisted to do single track, but because it is a pig in comparison to something like a DRZ or KLR single it will never be able to perform as well there. ADV bikes will not be thumpers.

The Dual Purpose won't like long days on the slab making time between exploring jeep tracks and mountain passes as much as an ADV bike will. Sure, you can do it, but it won't be as comfortable in those situations where the ability to carry a lot of equipment and eat entire days worth of 70mph make up a significant portion of the trip. Dual Purpose will mostly be mono-cylinderic.

Enduro bikes laugh at jeep tracks and mountain passes, and can handle single track/rough trails almost as well as purpose built off-roaders. They have much reduced carrying capacity from the Dual Purpose/ADV bikes, and may feel like they are geared too low for the highway.

You can go around the world having an adventure on either flavor, just depends on which blades you want to have at the ready on your Swiss Army Knife of a motorcycle.

It will be a challenge full of compromise to settle on a single bike that does it all. Possibly resulting in a ride that fits in neither pigeon hole as well as you might have hoped it would.
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Old 01-30-2014, 08:15 AM   #43
MotoTex
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Originally Posted by jmq3rd View Post
Very good, the only thing left out is the light end, like the KTM dual sports. I would further split your Dual Sport into 2 ranges:
I guess that will depend on what kind of adventure one expects to undertake with the bike.

Based on most of what this forum is about, It seems that carrying some luggage for over-nighting is a key aspect of Adventuring, and Enduros are best suited for day rides. In my book they are plenty of fun, but not everything expected from an Adventure bike. You wouldn't want to ride one around the world, or, spend weeks traversing the continent on one.

That is why my "other" bike is a plated DRZ400E, and why I consider it my dirt bike, but not my ADV bike. (though with soft bags it could do the job)
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Old 01-30-2014, 01:23 PM   #44
Sparrowhawk
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hippiebrian View Post
The perfect bike for an adventure is the one you have. People have gone adventure riding on anything with 2 wheels!

Ride more. Think about riding less.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MotoTex View Post
You wouldn't want to ride one around the world, or, spend weeks traversing the continent on one.
I'm with Brian. I would be happy to ride any motorcycle around the world or cross continent. I don't care if it's an "adventure bike", bagger, postie, chopper, dirt bike, Grom, sport bike, fat tire, e-bike, standard, or peddle bike. The machine would influence the route I choose and how much ground I might cover in a day, but I would have a grand adventure on any given two-wheeler.
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Old 01-30-2014, 03:37 PM   #45
MotoTex
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Originally Posted by Sparrowhawk View Post
I'm with Brian. I would be happy to ride any motorcycle around the world or cross continent. I don't care if it's an "adventure bike", bagger, postie, chopper, dirt bike, Grom, sport bike, fat tire, e-bike, standard, or peddle bike. The machine would influence the route I choose and how much ground I might cover in a day, but I would have a grand adventure on any given two-wheeler.
Allow me to rephrase it.

I wouldn't want to ride one around the world, or, spend weeks traversing the continent on one.

In my other post I tried to be clear that anyone can do anything with any bike they want. And, clearly some have done these things.

In general, the ride reports I've read on this forum fall into one of the two categories I described. Enduros, Bergmans, Low Riders, Panigales, Dongs, etc. are the exceptions.

Masochism has no limits, and far be it for me to try to impose any upon their ranks.

What did the Masochist say to the Sadist?
Beat me, beat me!
What did the Sadist say?
No.
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