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Old 02-07-2014, 04:33 AM   #31
outlaws justice
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottzilla View Post
You guys do realize trail braking has nothing to do with using the rear brake, right?
I think this is an internet thing. Before the internet everyone seemed to understand trail braking is the trailing off the front brake as you get deeper in to a corner or, at the minimum, braking into the corner, NOT modulating the rear brake.
Both brakes can be used for trail braking at the same time. Yes, the front is your primary brake so it is doing most of the work, but by using both the front and the rear and trailing off them as you increase the throttle, helps to keep the bike stable.
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Old 02-08-2014, 04:55 AM   #32
atomicalex
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Originally Posted by wep300 View Post
I'm used to it from racing FWD cars--only way you can get them to turn. But not relevant here...
I'm going to disagree with you on the relevancy aspect. Why? Because I have raced FWD cars, too, and you're right, it is the only way to get them to turn.

Good FSM, that would go a long way to explaining my inability to not trail brake! My riding instructor would yell at me about it, but once it's built into your hands, why would you not trail brake? It's so incredibly useful.
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Old 02-08-2014, 05:00 AM   #33
Barnone
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WTF is this off season that you speak of?
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Old 02-09-2014, 06:01 AM   #34
Thanantos OP
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Originally Posted by atomicalex View Post
I'm going to disagree with you on the relevancy aspect. Why? Because I have raced FWD cars, too, and you're right, it is the only way to get them to turn.

Good FSM, that would go a long way to explaining my inability to not trail brake! My riding instructor would yell at me about it, but once it's built into your hands, why would you not trail brake? It's so incredibly useful.
I was confused by this. Why would you apply this very specific theory of racing a very specific type of CAR to
motorcycles?
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Old 02-09-2014, 06:21 AM   #35
atomicalex
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It's the Offseason....Let's talk about Advanced Topics like Trail Braking

Weight management in FWD cars is a very unique thing. Particularly with front engine ones where the engine is significantly forward of the axles. You brake differently and take very different lines than with a traditional mid-engine RWD racecar, or with a rear engine one. When the weight is behind the major braking axle, you steer with the throttle and use the brakes relatively sparingly and early because snap oversteer kills. In FWD, you use the forward weight bias to gain traction at the front. This means you can brake later and deeper into the turn - trail braking. This is the concept of corner charging.

This is possible on bikes because we can vary our weight distribution by moving around on top. We can take advantage of the good bits of front engine and rear engine weight distributions without swapping vehicles.

Once you get the hang of it, it becomes a lifestyle.
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