ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > The perfect line and other riding myths
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-07-2014, 07:32 PM   #106
MotorcycleWriter OP
Studly Adventurer
 
MotorcycleWriter's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2012
Location: N.Alabama, World's Rockiest Trails
Oddometer: 910
Quote:
Originally Posted by scootrboi View Post
This is the company:
MotorcycleWriter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2014, 07:51 PM   #107
Albie
Kool Aid poisoner
 
Albie's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2004
Location: NWA
Oddometer: 8,920
Quote:
Originally Posted by windmill View Post
Thank you,
Let me return the favor.

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/some
MOST people understand that when someone uses MOST, that it also implies SOME are not included. But there are obviously SOME people who just don't understand.
__________________
Good. Bad. I'm the guy with the gun.

Another day, another foot injury!
Albie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2014, 09:27 AM   #108
markk53
jack of all trades...
 
markk53's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Location: Delaware Ohio
Oddometer: 7,850
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bloodweiser View Post
Read carefully.
That conversation was about TOOLS.
Guess I got wrapped up in the whole fix the Harley thing and missed that.

Now that is clear, this is clear too: You can do the same thing with a metric since virtually everyone that sells tools sells metric too. I have virtually NO special tools to deal with any of my bikes at this point.

The one time when I needed them was in fork rebuild to take the fork apart and another time when I needed to pull the flywheel. I could have gotten the tools, but it was easier to take the bike in and have the flywheel pulled for me (it wasn't easy, I watched and it took an air impact and some tapping to break it loose) and I just had them do the forks so it got done faster than I would have done them (inverted forks).

From there it's all been what's been collected over the years.
__________________
Ever get lost? You know, that good kind of lost - come to a dirt road intersection and you have no idea where you are or which way to turn? I like when that happens!

Mark - klx678
95 KLX650C w/Vulcan piston bigbore, Now an 09 KLX250S, selling my 90 Zephyr 550
markk53 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2014, 05:11 AM   #109
Tinker1980
Studly Adventurer
 
Tinker1980's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2012
Location: Nowhere, OK
Oddometer: 719
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flo_Evans View Post
Most motorcycle breakdowns in my humble experience have been simple mechanical affairs. (chain, tires, blown shocks) Occasionally you will see a dead battery or some blown fuses.

If someone can offer up some evidence of EFI or computers leaving them stranded in the middle of nowhere I am all ears. I've never in my life had a computer in a car or bike fail on me. It's not like they are using vacuum tubes anymore.
The igniter module on my Ex500 messed up once. It would make it five miles from the house, and the bike would die. By the time I had walked home to get the truck, or asked the wife to pretty please come get me with the truck, the bike would start again.

If you removed the igniter, and put it in the freezer, the bike would go all the way to work 15 miles away.

As for EFI leaving me stranded, ask me about my Isuzu Trooper. That stupid thing almost ended a marriage. I had time to work, sleep, and try to get the goddamned thing to run long enough to take me back to work. No time for anything else. It took over my life. Know what fixed the EFI? installing the intake manifold from a 4zd1 Isuzu engine, and putting a carburetor (Weber 32/36 DGAV) on it. When EFI is working, it's great. When it is randomly crapping out on you for no good reason, and you are tracing down yet another fucking dirty ground, bad sensor, etc etc etc, they are terrible. And it wasn't just an issue with that particular ´Zu - look into the 4ZE1 (2.6 liter) Isuzu engine - It's an overheating, head gasket eating, valve burning, clattering pile of failure.

On the other hand, the MPFI on my Jeep ZJ works flawlessly. As does the EFI on the wife's Saturn. So perhaps piss-poor design has a lot to do with it.

I'll keep riding my nice modern Dr650 (It's a 2009, newest vehicle I own, therefore I think it is modern) just to be safe.
Tinker1980 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2014, 05:27 AM   #110
randyo
Beastly Adventurer
 
randyo's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2007
Location: Northern NewEngland
Oddometer: 1,533
the title of this thread is Tech: Old
Reliable vs New Fangled


so first of, we are comparing old and RELIABLE, not old but unreliable

to what : New Fangled

new obviously is recently made
fangled is gaudy; showy; vainly decorated

then of course there is "newfangled" (all one word) which meanings are
1: attracted to novelty 2: of the newest style or kind


sorry, by any definition, I will take reliable first, in the contest of this thread, that must mean old
__________________
RandyO
IBA # 9560
07 VeeStrom
99 SV650
82 XV920R
A man with a gun is a citizen
A man without a gun is a subject
randyo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2014, 06:52 AM   #111
MotorcycleWriter OP
Studly Adventurer
 
MotorcycleWriter's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2012
Location: N.Alabama, World's Rockiest Trails
Oddometer: 910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinker1980 View Post
And it wasn't just an issue with that particular ´Zu - look into the 4ZE1 (2.6 liter) Isuzu engine - It's an overheating, head gasket eating, valve burning, clattering pile of failure.
Yup. Twenty years on and the letters "4ZE1" are still branded in my brain.
MotorcycleWriter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2014, 08:26 AM   #112
Gripsteruser
Service Monkey
 
Joined: Jul 2013
Location: N. Colo
Oddometer: 667
Quote:
Originally Posted by randyo View Post
sorry, by any definition, I will take reliable first, in the contest of this thread, that must mean old

I prefer the word and concept that the old has been "proven."

Some has been proven lousy. Other has been proven reliable.
The old that has survived and is desirable is proven reliable.
Gripsteruser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2014, 06:14 PM   #113
JohnCW
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Dec 2013
Location: Sydney, Australia
Oddometer: 976
An old fashioned gravity fed, push on rubber hose, with two spring clips ...... v's ........

http://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov/acms/cs...V617-4608P.pdf
JohnCW is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2014, 01:30 AM   #114
ObiJohn
Screaming Banshee
 
ObiJohn's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Location: Seattle suburbia
Oddometer: 515
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paebr332 View Post
This is only true ceteris paribus. In other words, the rule of thumb only applies if you are adding more stuff that has a similar failure rate to the original stuff.

Replacing a mechanical component with lots of electronic components which each have 5-9's reliability will actually increase the overall reliability of the system in most cases. Electronics have a different reliability hazard function than do mechanical components. Mechanical components tend to suffer significant infant mortality failures followed by a period of random failures, and then experience an end-of-life/wearout phase with ever increasing failure rates (mechanical wear in mechanical systems is a fact of physics). This is often called the "bathtub curve." Electronic components usually follow a decreasing failure rate curve with most failures being infant mortality failures. Wear out is by and large not an issue with electronics.

Counting the individual pixels on your display screen and transistors on your chips means there are literally millions of individual components in the device you are using to read this post. Add in all the electronic components in the internet between your device and the ADV servers and you get an inkling of just how reliable electronic components are. Electronics component reliability is orders of magnitude higher than mechanical component reliability. If it were not so, you would not be able to read this post.
This.

I own 5 motorcycles, but I won't count the CT90 or XR70. The other 3, a DN-01, FJR1300AE, and CRF230L, are all modern motorcycles with significant electronic subsystems. I also own a carbed '03 Rincon ATV. I've had more issues with the carbed vehicles, mostly pertaining to the fuel systems. The same was true with the CT and XR.

If I could get one upgrade instantly for my CRF and Rincon, it would be FI. I won't buy another vehicle without it.
__________________
Everything is on its way to somewhere...
ObiJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2014, 01:56 AM   #115
advNZer?
Beastly Adventurer
 
advNZer?'s Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2008
Location: Wellington,New Zealand
Oddometer: 2,733
Quote:
Originally Posted by MotorcycleWriter View Post
A vast wealth of reliability information flowed from the battlefields of World War II. Engine design changed drastically as a never before seen sample of machinery failed and was immediately researched, improved, and fielded. Nothing like fighting for one's way of life to spur innovation. Aircraft engines went two directions at this time. Slow turning, super-reliable radials like the R-2800 Double Wasp added power by stacking on more cylinders.



Higher revving, less-reliable but higher performing inline V's like the Merlin went for higher and higher compression, more valves, hemi compbustion chambers, and superchargers.



Sounds like your bike came from the radial school of thought. My only real gripe with radials is that they leak oil and there's nothing you can do about it except carry a pan around with you.
superchargers were also for performance at high alititude.
__________________
aka BMWST?
advNZer? is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2014, 02:47 AM   #116
Aj Mick
Studly Adventurer
 
Aj Mick's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Location: Phuket, Thailand
Oddometer: 553
Either, just keep it simple and properly maintained

While the leading edge tech amy have its glitches, by the time it makes it to common use it is usually reasonably well sorted.

New fangled is fine until they start trying to complicate things with too many gadgets and features. Just keep it simple and functional.

Old was only ever reliable if it was properly maintained and that is still true of new fangled. However old tended to require more maintenance. Think contact breaker points, frequent valve grinds, and the like. Few small petrol engines saw out 100,000 miles before requiring an overhaul.

So, new fangled provided it adds to functionality, but not if it just adds complication with no significant benefit.
__________________
there are old motorcyclists and bold motorcyclists
but you seldom meet an old, bold motorcyclist
Aj Mick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2014, 05:10 AM   #117
scootrboi
Beastly Adventurer
 
scootrboi's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Vermont
Oddometer: 1,363
Quote:
Originally Posted by advNZer? View Post
superchargers were also for performance at high alititude.
we hear a lot about the superiority of the Spitfire over the Me109, but Spitfires struggled with carburetors that would cut out in a dive, while Messerschmitts had fuel injection. 1940s!
__________________
42 years on a Heinkel Tourist
scootrboi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2014, 07:00 AM   #118
JohnCW
Studly Adventurer
 
Joined: Dec 2013
Location: Sydney, Australia
Oddometer: 976
Quote:
Originally Posted by scootrboi View Post
we hear a lot about the superiority of the Spitfire over the Me109, but Spitfires struggled with carburetors that would cut out in a dive, while Messerschmitts had fuel injection. 1940s!
Next time I'm riding into a vertical dive from 20,000 foot I'll remember that......
JohnCW is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2014, 07:18 AM   #119
mamm
< advertise here! >
 
mamm's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Location: Floripa, Brazil
Oddometer: 205
Can I have option C: new & reliable, please?
__________________
2012 R1200GS TB

Enjoy yourself, it's later than you think.
mamm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2014, 07:22 AM   #120
MotorcycleWriter OP
Studly Adventurer
 
MotorcycleWriter's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2012
Location: N.Alabama, World's Rockiest Trails
Oddometer: 910
Ouch!
MotorcycleWriter is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 06:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014