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Old 02-13-2014, 01:25 PM   #16
Mr Steam Turbine OP
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Originally Posted by ApexJeff View Post
Where are you now? Was Endurance any help? Keep us updated, I am going back down to Lima in about a month, can I help?

Yea, I found the shop and I wish I new these guy a couple months ago. The shop is clean, professional, and just looked good. Christian was also very helpful, but unfortunately he was booked up and couldn't fit me in with such short notice. It's a great resource to know about.
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Old 02-13-2014, 02:44 PM   #17
OK Lucinda
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Originally Posted by Misery Goat View Post
Leaving your bike in the hands of any mechanic you don't personally know is asking for trouble. This is where doing your own maintenance and having a basic understanding of your bike comes in handy. I'm shocked at the number of riders I met on the road who couldn't handle basic maintenance on their bikes, all BMW riders coincidentally.
OK, I want to make sure I understand you. Never once in your years of riding in Latin America have you met a non-BMW owner who couldn't maintain their bike?
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Old 02-13-2014, 03:44 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by TUCKERS View Post
You can maintain your own bike, but it's pretty hard to throw a clutch in a BMW oil head at the side of the road.
You're right. It's pretty tough on the side of the road. In an underground parking garage in the outskirts of Bogota it's a snap though. (that's my clutch on the ground by my foot)

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Old 02-13-2014, 05:08 PM   #19
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Airhead, since you know how to do your own maintenance I have a question that I could use your help with. When replacing the ring gear bearing, how do you measure the bearing preload? Dial Indicator to Torque Whench? This is the preload established by the shim thickness under the bearing when it is pressed into the housing.
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Old 02-13-2014, 05:12 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Airhead Wrangler View Post
You're right. It's pretty tough on the side of the road. In an underground parking garage in the outskirts of Bogota it's a snap though. (that's my clutch on the ground by my foot)


Is there anybody on this forum that took a BMW to South America that didnt have a failure of a major component??? I'm beginning to wonder..... still love my bike though.
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Old 02-13-2014, 05:22 PM   #21
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here is a clutch change in a autoparts parking lot ,at night.
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Old 02-13-2014, 07:02 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by OK Lucinda View Post
OK, I want to make sure I understand you. Never once in your years of riding in Latin America have you met a non-BMW owner who couldn't maintain their bike?
I can't recall meeting anyone on a non-BMW who was having mechanical issues they couldn't deal with on their own. That's just my own anecdotal experience I wouldn't try to interpolate any statistically significant meaning from it.
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Old 02-13-2014, 07:09 PM   #23
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And the BMW hating goes on. Pathetic and senseless. I happen to know a lot of BMW owners are very good at doing their own maintenance and up keep. Also know people with other brands that have the shops do their oil changes for them. Know what that means? Absolutely nothing.
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Old 02-13-2014, 07:12 PM   #24
H96669
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Originally Posted by Mr Steam Turbine View Post
Airhead, since you know how to do your own maintenance I have a question that I could use your help with. When replacing the ring gear bearing, how do you measure the bearing preload? Dial Indicator to Torque Whench? This is the preload established by the shim thickness under the bearing when it is pressed into the housing.
I could tell you, just checked two rear drives a couple weeks ago. But that would take too long.

Watch the video first and then I'll give you the warning as to how that method may not work for some. BTW...I haven't travelled down there yet but I sure do carry a spare bearing and the cheap tools required to replace mine on the road. Give me a motel/hostel with cooking facilities, I'll be back on the road quick. Preload...naaah I'll keep travelling and later do that.

Video, go there for the link, post 21:

http://www.bmwlt.com/forums/showthre...256#post519256
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Old 02-13-2014, 07:23 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Misery Goat View Post
I can't recall meeting anyone on a non-BMW who was having mechanical issues they couldn't deal with on their own
WTF?

You're now saying that although you 'can't recall' from the non-BMW camp anyone not being not able to deal with thier issues, you can definitely re-call that cery single person who couldn't fix their bike was a BMW owner, in all of your years of riding down here.

Jesus, you US Calvary officers have got to quit this shit.
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Old 02-13-2014, 08:18 PM   #26
crashmaster
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that truly sucks ass. sorry. not that the chances of them doing aything are all that good, but i would certainly entertain the thought of writing bmw a nice letter.
What TeeVee suggests may help. Or phone calls to someone you know at a BMW dealer to help get the ball rolling. It will probably take some time and maybe not quick enough to salvage the rest of your travels, but its for sure worth a shot. Hang in there and keep trying, don't give up without a good fight.

Really sorry to hear about your experience. I've been burned by dealer maintenance before, (KTM) but it wasn't anything serious fortunately, so I got lucky. I normally do all my own maintenance, but sometimes when you're traveling, you don't have a huge tool cabinet or a decent place to work, and you need to fix something fairly complex, going to a shop seems like the right thing to do. Don't beat yourself up over it. I totally get it.

Hopefully you can get in touch with the right folks at BMW and they will make it right, and your travels can continue.

Suerte!
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Old 02-13-2014, 08:36 PM   #27
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I would never take an oil head on a RTW trip..to hard to fix when they self destruct. Now an Airhead can be fixed with a hammer, bailing wire and duct tape....and basic tools in the tool kit. Tranny removal easily less than two hours...
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Old 02-13-2014, 08:40 PM   #28
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It's one thing to be able to fix it, which most people can do given enough time, the correct tools, the will, and the access to parts. It is another thing to want to personally deal with it while on a road trip/adventure (vacation). Theoretically, a BMW shop should be trusted to do basic maintenance and repairs while the owner goes to lunch, especially given the prices they charge for their premium service. They fix it, you review their work and inspect the parts they replaced. That's basic service protocol.

It seems like there is a recurring theme with the great worldwide BMW super mechanic network, that the dealerships actually carry very few parts in stock. Ordering parts from Germany is not a network. I'd be curious to know if there is actually a regional BMW parts distribution warehouse located anywhere in South America or even Mexico.

My solution has always been to own a Jap bike. They don't break.

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Old 02-13-2014, 08:52 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by SR View Post
It's one thing to be able to fix it, which most people can do given enough time, the correct tools, the will, and the access to parts. It is another thing to want to personally deal with it while on a road trip/adventure (vacation). Theoretically, a BMW shop should be trusted to do basic maintenance and repairs while the owner goes to lunch, especially given the prices they charge for their premium service. They fix it, you review their work and inspect the parts they replaced. That's basic service protocol.

It seems like a recurring theme with the great worldwide BMW super mechanic network, that the dealerships actually carry very few parts in stock. Ordering parts from Germany is not a network. I'd be curious to know if there is actually a regional BMW parts distribution warehouse located anywhere in South America or even Mexico.

My solution, has always been to own a Jap bike. They don't break.
That's a post Ill drink to
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Old 02-14-2014, 04:08 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by Mr Steam Turbine View Post
Airhead, since you know how to do your own maintenance I have a question that I could use your help with. When replacing the ring gear bearing, how do you measure the bearing preload? Dial Indicator to Torque Whench? This is the preload established by the shim thickness under the bearing when it is pressed into the housing.

My opinion of you just went way up.
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