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Old 02-16-2014, 07:42 AM   #31
Foot dragger
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Originally Posted by canoeguy View Post
So let's talk about what to do in the case of drawing in water. Obviously kill the bike as soon as possible. So where do I go from there. Not having horizontal heads on my thumper makes pulling the plug and draining water impossible.

Any good sources for obtaining a base knowledge on some enduro skills to apply to adv riding?
If its really full of water,it wont start again until certain things are done.

Exhaust needs emptied,standing the bike on end,rolling it around sideways till water quits coming out the back of the muffler.

Air filter,airboot,airbox need any and all hidden puddles of water got out,having a dry towel to blot the filter/dry the airbox with is great.

Plug needs to come out,bike needs to be upside down,engine needs to be turned over by spinning the back wheel by hand or kickstarter. This seems very labor intensive,and it is. Carb needs draining,maybe a few times.
Gas tank/seat.etc will come off to get to the plug on many thumpers.

Leave the air filter out when you finally do try to start it,once it fires the filter goes back in.

Trying to start it with out doing all this if its really full of water is a bad idea,engine will continue to suck water through the filter and carb,wont start and maybe will bend a rod. I was with a long time expert enduro guy doing all this and he stressed to not try to start it,do the work first and then start it.

If a 4 stroke engine has lots of water in it the oil turns to a sort of milkshake consistency,obviously not the best thing for expensive engine/trans parts.

A 2 stroke is ready to roll once it fires and should be fine,the trans very rarely gets water in it and fresh clean gas/oil is circulating once the engine runs.

If you think deep water may be encountered,and dont carry all the tools to do these things,then it better happen in an area where a bike can be towed back to the truck,not always a possibility in steep terrain.
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Old 02-16-2014, 07:48 AM   #32
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If you go fast enough, it doesn't matter how deep it is...you won't touch the bottom



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Old 02-16-2014, 07:50 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by dddd View Post
Hi,

I'd like to run a technique by you guys. It's just theory for me but maybe you have tried it already.

Assuming one will walk aside the bike, how about strapping the bike in a (safe) way on one's shoulders to remove weight (not lift) mostly to the front and give oneself some extra traction, as if moving a big house appliance ?

(by safe, I mean, easy exit/cutoff from those straps if falling/tumbling/drowning)

Thanks.
I would venture a guess that 100% of us Havent tried strapping a 3 or 4 hundred lb bike on our back and crossing a creek that way. Maybe practicing with a refridgerator would be a good thing.
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Old 02-16-2014, 07:50 AM   #34
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If you go fast enough, it doesn't matter how deep it is...you won't touch the bottom



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Again,a video is needed.
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Old 02-16-2014, 08:00 AM   #35
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If its really full of water,it wont start again until certain things are done.
Thanks, this exactly the info I am looking for. Looks like I would jerk the tank off too as it will make "rolling" a KLR around a touch easier.

As I mentioned I am asking because I am headed to Central America and I am going at the start of the rainy season. I have forded creeks there multiple times, but always on four wheels.

I will be the first to admit that in my almost 20 years of riding I have stayed on road. I will be getting as much dirt in as possible before leaving in two months, but I don't know that I am too inspired to practise water crossings.

Being a white water boater I understand the power of rivers. There fore I would not cross anything that is flowing too much. I also expect to be alone unless I meet up with some one on the road.
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Old 02-16-2014, 08:10 AM   #36
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mossy crossings can be so slick that you can not walk them.

There is an invasive moss known as rock snot. If you encounter it, do not cross, the next stream you hit may not be contaminated and you will spread this stuff. That is assuming you make it across at all, which is unlikely.

One drop of water is all that is needed to spread this stuff.

If motorcyclists get to spreading this stuff, expect many more closings.

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Old 02-16-2014, 08:11 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by canoeguy View Post
Thanks, this exactly the info I am looking for. Looks like I would jerk the tank off too as it will make "rolling" a KLR around a touch easier.

As I mentioned I am asking because I am headed to Central America and I am going at the start of the rainy season. I have forded creeks there multiple times, but always on four wheels.

I will be the first to admit that in my almost 20 years of riding I have stayed on road. I will be getting as much dirt in as possible before leaving in two months, but I don't know that I am too inspired to practise water crossings.

Being a white water boater I understand the power of rivers. There fore I would not cross anything that is flowing too much. I also expect to be alone unless I meet up with some one on the road.
Practice it first, both to make sure your T mod is working, there are no leaks that will stop the bike like the ignition cover, and so you know what you can and can't do before you get in a situation where your life depends on it.
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Old 02-16-2014, 10:44 AM   #38
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Loving these pictures!
If you like the pictures, read the RR! You may change your trip plans.

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=834987

There's a lot more pictures of stream/river crossings...and a few videos. One is of the bike in the deep water road pic.


I generally stay away from deep stream crossings because of getting water into the wheel bearings. If you are going to do what you are talking about, take along at least one extra set of wheel bearings, and the tools to change them. You may very well need them and it will suck big time if you have one go in the middle of BFE and don't have any spares.
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Old 02-16-2014, 11:07 AM   #39
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If its really full of water,it wont start again until certain things are done....

All this is pretty good advice. Remember that water is not compressible so if you get it in areas that are trying to compress it (like combustion chambers) it will bend things and then you are screwed. When I sunk my Yamaha 490 it took a good 15 minutes of cranking water out of it before it would start again. Remember, if you do sink your bike and get it running again on the trail it's best to replace all the fluids when you get home.
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Old 02-16-2014, 12:18 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KX50002 View Post
If you go fast enough, it doesn't matter how deep it is...you won't touch the bottom
Again,a video is needed.
Her you go http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TYB7DYWI4G8
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Old 02-16-2014, 12:19 PM   #41
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>>>Assuming one will walk aside the bike, how about strapping the bike in a (safe) way on one's shoulders to remove weight (not lift) mostly to the front and give oneself some extra traction, as if moving a big house appliance ?
<<

I dunno, strapping yourself in any way to a 400lb weight in water sounds like a recipe for an accidental drowning. What if the bike slips over away from you and drags you over, maybe with your head in the water or ends up limited your arm movement if you get pinned.
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Old 02-16-2014, 01:26 PM   #42
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I've thought about installing a pull kill switch like the sea doo's have, to just easily yank out if the bike starts to go under.

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Old 02-16-2014, 03:35 PM   #43
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Again,a video is needed.
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Old 02-16-2014, 06:10 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillsburgGS View Post
>>>Assuming one will walk aside the bike, how about strapping the bike in a (safe) way on one's shoulders to remove weight (not lift) mostly to the front and give oneself some extra traction, as if moving a big house appliance ?
<<

I dunno, strapping yourself in any way to a 400lb weight in water sounds like a recipe for an accidental drowning. What if the bike slips over away from you and drags you over, maybe with your head in the water or ends up limited your arm movement if you get pinned.

Any such strap/loop begins with a quick release, of course. I'm thinking those non-knots or friction knots (including those with a ring) that immediately come undone when you let go one brake hand.

Also, see the highwayman hitch http://www.animatedknots.com/highwaymans/index.php


Anyway, my question is not about the strapping system, it is about whether this pulling technique would make the bike noticeably more moveable.

dddd screwed with this post 02-16-2014 at 06:16 PM
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Old 02-16-2014, 06:27 PM   #45
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Originally Posted by dddd View Post
Any such strap/loop begins with a quick release, of course. I'm thinking those non-knots or friction knots (including those with a ring) that immediately come undone when you let go one brake hand.

Also, see the highwayman hitch http://www.animatedknots.com/highwaymans/index.php


Anyway, my question is not about the strapping system, it is about whether this pulling technique would make the bike noticeably more moveable.
I dont know about the strapping the bike to the body thing,but Ive seen guys get off and walk next to the bike working the throttle and clutch to get a bike through water.
The bike sags maybe 4" with a person on it,so with no weight it rides higher and wont suck water as quick.

But water and bikes really dont get along in the long run,as noted wheel bearings can be the first to go south,if the water has silt/mud in it so much the worse as it finds it's way in with the water.

I buried a YZ250 rear wheel in a silty river mudhole and the bearings in that wheel died the next ride,the fine silt got past the seals and ate the bearings quick like.

The engine can die in much the same fashion if some fresh oil isnt found very soon. Its a dramatic thing to do,crossing water,and no way to avoid it many times. But it can turn ugly sometimes.
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