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Old 08-01-2014, 01:47 PM   #106
cccolin OP
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Ha. Fair enough
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Old 08-02-2014, 09:45 PM   #107
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how much do motorcycle sales people make? i'd do that. maybe part time? do i get to zoom around town on the bikes?
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I'm not a sales person, I'm a mechanic at a vintage shop. but yes, I get to ride the bikes. lots of old guzzis, ducs, bmws, but mostly Hondas and Yamahas. it's fun. plus we listen to good music, there's a coffee roaster right next to us that gives us free coffee all the time, there's a vending machine with dollar beers in it (not for me, but the other guys like it), and my favorite part... a constant stream of mind-blowingly hot girls walking by all day.
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Gimme a yell in 20 or 30 years when you're still doin' this and the hot firls think you're a creepy old guy. And you have no money.
ah man, that's my dream. and i could be living it now!

or should be. hell man, i'll take it for the next 20 years with the bikes. and the girls

but minus me being creepy

plus i can't fix squat so wonder how a shop would feel about a 70 year old trying to sell liter bikes to teenagers, or Bonneville's to your random hipster? if we still have hipsters in 20 years or so...
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Old 08-02-2014, 09:48 PM   #108
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damn dudes i started riding kinda late in life i am nearly dead already!
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Old 08-02-2014, 10:05 PM   #109
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Hey Dude, you know that you don't have to start a new post every time you think of one more sentence to write, right?
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Old 08-02-2014, 10:41 PM   #110
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^^


yes, i guess i will contain that from now on. it does tend to become bad form when posting in multiple threads a few times a day

will use edit button and...editing from now on

but yes, interesting thread. having a motorcycle business must be some sort of passion for many. at least in the U.S. its not very glamourous unless you love bikes, i would think. it seems many struggle financially in such a small, specialized market

fixing motorcycles? idk? i have known plenty of mechanics in my life who think being one is no big deal. even mechanics i consider talented. it seems work some don't like doing, but do it anyway

and some guys don't see it as a specialized craft anymore. even when it obviously is. fixing bikes and cars and such is not a skill all are good at

i just break stuff. really. and can be "all thumbs." even when i try. thats why i leave the heavy stuff to the pros. and just about anything technical, too. or safety related. brakes simple enough to do? guess so. but i don't trust myself enough to count on my work at 100mph on the freeway, with a sudden slowdown ahead

thats important work imo. not to be taken for granted

might be nice to walk into a showroom of motorcycles everyday, though. my local Yamaha dealer? guy sits at a desk at the entrance all day, taking calls, making calls, and talking about motorcycles to people walking in off the street. might sell a few, too

sounds like a good day, to me. and i like what i do now!

so maybe not. but, could be worse
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Old 08-03-2014, 05:35 AM   #111
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I've been closely following thiss thread as I've often considered changing my life and selling some of my commercial real estate and buying a franchised motorcycle dealership.

I think I recall there was one user here that owned a BMW dealer in CA IIRC? If there is anyone here, I would love to discuss the realities of owning and operating a medium to large sized dealership.

OP: I'd say give it a shot. Online sales would be essential I would assume especially living in a small area. I've seen non franchise shops for sale netting owners anywhere from $0 ( many business make nothing. ) all the way up to and over $300K a year.

Good luck following your passion.
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Old 08-03-2014, 08:53 PM   #112
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[QUOTE=motoracer51;24761622
I think I recall there was one user here that owned a BMW dealer in CA IIRC?
[/QUOTE]

That would be the inmate known as Deans BMW.
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Old 08-04-2014, 10:06 PM   #113
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As I understand it, manufacturers give a dealership very little (less than $500 each) for each new 'major unit' (complete motorcycle or atv) sold. Your income is from accessories, parts, and billable shop labor hours.

When the economy is good:
You may be making more of your gross profit from major units sold. Everything from a PW50, or r11050gs makes you $500 each. Many MU's going out the door, and you don't have to sell shirts, accessories, parts, or shop labor. Easy and laughs all around.

When the economy is shite, wintertime, post-4th-of July, post-Christmas:
Now you rely on keeping your mechanics working with jobs that provide billable hours. Among the big spectrum of clients, you need to separate the few that have:
(1.) a bike that all the parts can be bought for (think post-1990 Japanese bikes, but even some 1994 bikes have no-longer-available parts)
(2.) a customer that will pay their bill,
(3.) a customer who will promptly pay their bill and not in 6 months after the work is completed,
(4.) a bike that is just right in that it can be worked on ... many older bikes when serviced will start breaking more and more ... carbs didn't leak until we removed and reinstalled them, brittle wires and parts that break while being serviced (customers love paying for that ... not).
(5.) a local economy that can sustain people with such toys or work vehicles. Here we don't really have that. If you're in an area and have steady supply of ranch-work ATV's that need repair that is great! People that work tend to have money and want their work-machines working right and need them back in service. When it is strictly play-toys that maintenance and service is the first thing to be deleted when money gets tight.

Assuming your area isn't over-supplied with motorcycle businesses, I suggest checking into that before working the idea up. I think a normal modern motorcycle business needs to have several arms: proficient in repair, able to sell parts well, sell new or good used bikes in a variety of genre's, and have an online presence, as WELL as have an eBay presence selling used parts/new parts. When the economy changes, you'll need a versatile business existence to survive.

A wise friend once said, "once you do something for a job, it's no longer fun anymore." I think that is succinct and correct. If you don't want to lose this activity from your life in that way, sell something else. I think lawn mowers and garden tractors would be a stable and durable good.
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Old 08-04-2014, 10:12 PM   #114
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profit hungry administrations
You know as a business you will become "profit hungry"?
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Old 08-05-2014, 08:05 AM   #115
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yes, but there's a difference between trying to make a profit and screwing all of your employees and customers (students) as hard as possible in the process, and having to squeeze blood out of a turnip because the adminstrators were recently convicted of embezzeling. particularly when you are a school.
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Old 08-06-2014, 02:30 AM   #116
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Good luck :)
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Old 08-06-2014, 05:49 AM   #117
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yes, but there's a difference between trying to make a profit and screwing all of your employees and customers (students) as hard as possible in the process, and having to squeeze blood out of a turnip because the adminstrators were recently convicted of embezzeling. particularly when you are a school.
If they are truly "screwing" the employees and customers than word will get around, they'll lose students and will have trouble finding qualified instructors, and they'll eventually go out of business. It's how things work in a free(ish) market.
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Old 08-06-2014, 08:17 AM   #118
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unfortunately, the rules of the free market don't really apply to private, "top tier" post-secondary education. Everyone knows this particular school treats people like shit and pays exceptionally poorly, but it's NY, and everyone is scrambling for a job and will take what they can get, and are terrified to let go of a job once they find one, due to the cost of living, the poor job market, etc. and there are so many hungry young qualified candidates, with so few jobs available in arts education, that if a vacancy comes up, it will get filled immediately almost no matter what or for what institution the job is. the students see the school's rankings in US News or wherever and their eyes go googly (and no, a good ranking in US News does not mean it's a great school. Art Schools in the US News rankings are ranked solely based on the opinion of the school in the eyes of faculty at other art schools.) Once they get there, it's much easier to stay and put up with it than it is to transfer to another school, particularly after they make it through their first year, which is when they start to realize that the school does not have their best interests or their education as a top priority. By their second year, when they REALLY understand how much the school is fucking them (to the tune of $45k a year), they are at a point where they would have to take an extra year or more of school and a lose a lot of money by transferring.

If I were to start listing examples of employee treatment, pay rates, budgets vs tuition, etc etc etc, it would be very clear that it's not just my personal opinion of the place. Of the 6 co-workers in my department (not the whole department, just the 6 people that I worked with directly) (including myself), only 1 isn't quitting in 2014.
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Old 08-06-2014, 04:27 PM   #119
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unfortunately, the rules of the free market don't really apply to private, "top tier" post-secondary education. Everyone knows this particular school treats people like shit and pays exceptionally poorly, but it's NY, and everyone is scrambling for a job and will take what they can get, and are terrified to let go of a job once they find one, due to the cost of living, the poor job market, etc. and there are so many hungry young qualified candidates, with so few jobs available in arts education, that if a vacancy comes up, it will get filled immediately almost no matter what or for what institution the job is. the students see the school's rankings in US News or wherever and their eyes go googly (and no, a good ranking in US News does not mean it's a great school. Art Schools in the US News rankings are ranked solely based on the opinion of the school in the eyes of faculty at other art schools.) Once they get there, it's much easier to stay and put up with it than it is to transfer to another school, particularly after they make it through their first year, which is when they start to realize that the school does not have their best interests or their education as a top priority. By their second year, when they REALLY understand how much the school is fucking them (to the tune of $45k a year), they are at a point where they would have to take an extra year or more of school and a lose a lot of money by transferring.

If I were to start listing examples of employee treatment, pay rates, budgets vs tuition, etc etc etc, it would be very clear that it's not just my personal opinion of the place. Of the 6 co-workers in my department (not the whole department, just the 6 people that I worked with directly) (including myself), only 1 isn't quitting in 2014.
Um, you just described the free market economy as it applies to job availability and wages!
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Old 08-06-2014, 05:43 PM   #120
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i think what cccolin may be saying is you don't have to "be in it" for the money to make money. it all depends on what you choose to think about everyday, and how you think about it

the more money coming in and the less going out is good in any business. but all that stuff will or will not happen according to many factors

but being obsessed with profit does not mean you will make one, and can make some folks miserable in the process. so some choose to see business a bit differently, and think about running one a bit differently. and some make a lot of money with that different attitude. whether they have profit coming out the ass or barely trickling out of the faucet, you do all you can to run a business right. the chips will fall where they will as we see with many businesses which fail while being 100% "profit driven" owned and run
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