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Old 02-21-2014, 09:25 PM   #46
Zeid OP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ianmp View Post
I want to put my worthless opinion here too.

I've been in several major crashes throughout my riding career, I've broken my neck, ankle, and elbow all in separate incidents. Torn ACL, torn AC, bruised lungs dislocated ribs; I've crashed in full gear, partial gear, and helmet only.

Motorcycling is dangerous and pointless, so its about risk management. Is the risk of death / brain damage worth the wind through your hair? Not to me. Is it insane to risk getting road rash wearing jeans riding around town once in awhile? Not to me. It's a custom tailored cost/benefit analysis.

If you enjoyed riding around on a Harley with just a helmet, then do that on your other bike once in awhile. It's a numbers game though so mind how often. Also, passengers are fun on occasion, but they are taxing-- I wouldn't want to ride with one more often than otherwise
Yeah, I agree. A helmet is just a must. It makes me too uneasy even if I feel the wind in my hair. I'll always wear a full face helmet. I don't even mind wearing my riding boots (good pair of tourmasters) but jeans and a T-shirt some times just feels nice.

To add on more I will say this much as well. I wanted to take a little ride across town today using just city streets, less crowded ones at that. I ended up having to get up on the highways to make it home in time. HWY60, I-10, I-17, near rush hour right through the middle of downtown Phoenix with my jeans and a T-shirt on. I gotta admit, it felt weird. I wished I had my jacket on at that point and my gloves. I guess there are occasions where I feel better in the gear and some where I'm just putting around the suburbs up here or going to the coffee shop where a helmet and normal attire seems fine. I think I may have found a balance
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Old 02-22-2014, 06:25 AM   #47
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Originally Posted by KX50002 View Post
Wow, maybe motorcycles aren't meant for you? I can't imagine crashing that much and continuing to ride. I've only been riding for about 38 years...maybe with a little more experience?

BTW I actually enjoy h having my wife ride on the back,

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I'm with you. Similar amount of experience probably, not making a habit out of pushing my luck. I enjoy riding and obeying the laws at the same time. I hardly ever pass anyone who is going any where near the limit. My main goal is to be able to walk for the rest of my life.
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Old 02-22-2014, 07:29 AM   #48
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I'm with you. Similar amount of experience probably, not making a habit out of pushing my luck. I enjoy riding and obeying the laws at the same time. I hardly ever pass anyone who is going any where near the limit. My main goal is to be able to walk for the rest of my life.
Don't get me wrong I like to go fast sometimes, but I am wreckless not reckless :)

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Old 02-22-2014, 07:40 AM   #49
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It's not the motorcycle or gear. Something else is going on inside yer nugget.
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Old 03-18-2014, 07:59 AM   #50
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Originally Posted by KX50002 View Post
Wow, maybe motorcycles aren't meant for you? I can't imagine crashing that much and continuing to ride. I've only been riding for about 38 years...maybe with a little more experience?

BTW I actually enjoy h having my wife ride on the back,

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If you haven't been hurt, then I'm happy for you. Don't get complacent though.
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Old 03-20-2014, 12:01 PM   #51
maden
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Old saying.

In Norway we have an old saying:

There are two types of motorcycle riders. Those who have crashed and those who are going to crash… (No bullshit)

I´m in the first category and i know how much it hurts low siding in just 50mph. No way I am trying that without gear :)
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Old 03-20-2014, 12:31 PM   #52
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Originally Posted by fastdadio View Post
Get a wave runner and ride it nekkid. That should give you your fix.
Yeah but those get-offs can be real ball busters...
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Old 03-21-2014, 09:20 AM   #53
KX50002
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Originally Posted by ianmp View Post
If you haven't been hurt, then I'm happy for you. Don't get complacent though.
That's the secret, no complacency here.
When I was in the Navy we had a saying on the hangar wall in really large etters "Eternal vigilance is the price of freedom" it applies in many aspects of life.
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Old 03-21-2014, 09:47 AM   #54
TheProphet
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"Freedom" is having the ability to dress however you feel is proper, without worrying or thinking about what other people think. Dressing merely to please other riders, or to fit in with other riders is the opposite of "Freedom".

Then again, if you do have a mishap while riding, and due to a lack of protective wear you receive injuries that delay or negate your ability to ride, then all "Freedom" possibilities are gone.

Yin/Yang, balance, common sense, and being secure enough to live within your own skin... priceless.

Lastly, I think that there is plenty of gear out there that fits comfortably, is not restrictive or bulky, and can help achieve that balance. But ya' gotta' spend the time to research it.
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Old 03-22-2014, 12:12 PM   #55
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You have to protect your head.

Wind in your hair buy a convertible.

You are trying to protect yourself from an injury that would ruin your day or ruin your life where otherwise you might be dusting yourself off and thinking next time I will that differently.

That being said there is a type of riding, I don't know what to call it, dry pavement, sunny day, low traffic riding where I think if you keep your speed legal, a certain type of bike think HD, where skill, experience, wisdom reduce the chance of accident so low that it's not crazy to ride in shorts, a t shirt and sandals, and a shorty helmet.

I think what makes a big difference for me is I only ride my bikes for the joy and challenge of riding. So if the joy and challenge is riding to inuvik or exploring challenging roads, trails, I gear up. If I want to feel the wind I do that too but ride appropriately.
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Old 03-24-2014, 09:17 AM   #56
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I've never felt more free than when I'm on my bike. I don't think about the bad things in life. I don't think about my past and all the pain it brought me. I just focus on the ride, the road ahead, and how best to attack the twisties in front of me.

Sure, I wear full gear, and ride a big heavy sport-tourer. Doesn't matter to me. I'm on a motorcycle, and I'm going places. That's freedom to me.
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Old 03-24-2014, 08:43 PM   #57
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The thing about the gear you wear is that it should be both physically and psychologically comfortable. The good thing about so much modern riding gear is that it meets both needs.

Except for a very narrow temperature band with no rain - a T-shirt and jeans don't pass the physical comfort test. And, when you get used to the feeling of "being suited up for the ride," that minimal attire, for many of us, is mentally uncomfortable. Like others, I have to disagree with the idea that you can "ride slower and pay more attention" with lesser gear. Seems to me that you ALWAYS need all the attention you can bring to riding! Great gear CAN minimize injuries in a crash (and has in the two I've had) but it doesn't come with a guarantee of survival.

When I started riding (before and after a MSF course which got me my MC endorsement) I borrowed an old thumper and a half-face helmet from a friend. Bought a leather jacket at a thrift store, had some leather work gloves, leather hiking boots on my feet and jeans. Not a terrible way to find out if this was a passing fancy before spending bigger bucks on a bike and riding gear.

Here is what I have learned since - and feel free to disagree:
HELMET: The first time I got caught in rain, and not too far from home, I KNEW I had to get a full-face helmet. At only 50 mph, those rain drops hurt! I have never understood riders who are willing to endure rain or bugs in their face, at least when riding on the road. Went from full face to flip up and back to full face. Probably go back to a flip up. There is also always that possibility of a stone chip to the face shield - or face. The scariest ride yet for me was close to home and involved heavy rain and hail. And the really scary part wasn't the road surface but helmet fogging. Had to lift the shield a little to clear the fog - and immediately had water on both sides to look through. Ordered a Pin-lock visor the very next day. Just great!

JACKET AND PANTS: Went from a used two-piece leather suit to adding a ventilated jacket in very hot weather, then a Rev-It two piece suit. In very hot weather, add a water-soaked cut off cotton sweat shirt under the vented jacket for hours of comfortable riding thanks to evaporative cooling in the drier climate of the west. In cold weather, an electric jacket with thermostat does the job. Surprisingly, I find the riding pants, complete with the rain liner and a pair of light pants under that, good for moderate temperatures and just fine when it is really hot - much better than jeans which can really fry your legs in the heat. (My theory is that the air between those pant layers insulates my legs from both engine heat and the hot air above the asphalt. But all I really care is that it works for me.)

GLOVES AND BOOTS: For several years have been happy with Held Steve II for most riding and Held Warm n' Dry for rain or cold, with thin glove liners for really cold. Very happy with BMW AllRounds on my feet. Lots of great alternatives in both gloves and boots, of course. Really important to try them on to make sure they fit YOU.

EARPLUGS: Always. They preserve my hearing, let me hear what I need to while shutting out what I don't need to hear, and make riding a more serene experience.

The two big downsides of gear are 1. the time it takes to get into it and out of it, and 2. wearing it while shopping or even eating. My solution: if there are more than a couple stops for local errands, take the car. If there are only a couple stops to the nearby town, extend the trip for an hour or so of back road pleasure to make donning the gear worth it.

If your ideas differ from mine (and virtually all of even the ATGATT disciples will differ) that is just fine. Sometimes we can learn something new from the folk who basically agree with us. I'm also way too old to try to win converts. Enjoy your riding and I hope you make it safely home on every trip.
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Old 03-24-2014, 10:00 PM   #58
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When looking at "freedom" in terms of being hampered by gear and your bike's specifications (weight, load, etc.)think like someone who has OCD and must be proactively preventative to have an average life.

By that, I mean:

If not wearing your gear is going to increase how much you worry about possible injury and derive less enjoyment from the ride, then wearing gear will increase your enjoyment because you will have less worry of injury (don't go on about real versus perceived injury risk; its not the point)

If your moto's weight or configuration is hampering your ride, then refine your ability to operate it as it is, or find an alternative.
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Old 03-24-2014, 10:21 PM   #59
JerryH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by No False Enthusiasm View Post
"Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose..." Kristofferson

Jeans, T-shirt, fatigue jacket, and jump boots... '70s riding gear.

Now, I'm all the gear, all the time. Gear got better, and I got smarter...

NFE
This is 100% true. You cannot be free if you have anything to loose. You might also want to listen to the campfire discussion about freedom in the movie "Easy Rider" Nobody is truly free. But I choose to be free of ATGATT. I have never ridden like that, and never will. I passed the half million mile mark some time ago, with no injuries. I do wear a full face helmet, more for protection from the wind and what's in the wind more than anything else. I wear protection from the cold if necessary. Otherwise it's jeans, a t shirt or MX jersey, and cheap work boots from Walmart. I dress for the ride, not the crash. I also dress to avoid crashing, like high visibility colors. I use a headlight and brake light modulator. I would be pretty upset now if I had ridden the past half a million miles wearing 100 pounds of gear and being absolutely miserable, and never needed it.

Gear is like insurance. Some people spend every dime they can get, trying to insure themselves against everything. As far as vehicle insurance I go with state required minimums, and take the risk. The risk is not very high. I already have medical insurance, and do not own any expensive vehicles.

Riding a motorcycle is dangerous, gear or no gear. Nobody has to ride a motorcycle. If you feel the risk is too great, then drive a car. It is the risk, and beating the odds with your skills that makes riding a motorcycle so exhilarating. You can take every possible precaution, and still die. If you call what you were doing living.
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Old 03-24-2014, 11:17 PM   #60
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This is 100% true. You cannot be free if you have anything to loose. You might also want to listen to the campfire discussion about freedom in the movie "Easy Rider" Nobody is truly free. But I choose to be free of ATGATT. I have never ridden like that, and never will. I passed the half million mile mark some time ago, with no injuries. I do wear a full face helmet, more for protection from the wind and what's in the wind more than anything else. I wear protection from the cold if necessary. Otherwise it's jeans, a t shirt or MX jersey, and cheap work boots from Walmart. I dress for the ride, not the crash. I also dress to avoid crashing, like high visibility colors. I use a headlight and brake light modulator. I would be pretty upset now if I had ridden the past half a million miles wearing 100 pounds of gear and being absolutely miserable, and never needed it.

Gear is like insurance. Some people spend every dime they can get, trying to insure themselves against everything. As far as vehicle insurance I go with state required minimums, and take the risk. The risk is not very high. I already have medical insurance, and do not own any expensive vehicles.

Riding a motorcycle is dangerous, gear or no gear. Nobody has to ride a motorcycle. If you feel the risk is too great, then drive a car. It is the risk, and beating the odds with your skills that makes riding a motorcycle so exhilarating. You can take every possible precaution, and still die. If you call what you were doing living.
Hey man, I like you! 500,000 miles without a crash is something that beats me hands down. And you have figured out how to ride in cold weather. How does the T-shirt work in really hot weather? Is that your garb for comfort an image? I wouldn't ask except you obviously ride many miles a year and thus must undergo many days of very changeable temps and weather conditions. You clearly have something to teach us.
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