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Old 02-22-2014, 10:15 AM   #1
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What would Teddy Roosevelt ride?

I greatly admire Teddy Roosevelt. He was a man's man, hunter, fisher, conservationist, boxer, athlete, soldier, statesman.

Personally, I think he would have loved the physical challenge of hard off road riding. I can see him on a 250 2 stroke hitting the mountain trails.

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I suppose it sounds archaic, but I cannot help thinking that the people with motor boats miss a great deal. If they would only keep to rowboats or canoes, and use oar or paddle themselves, they would get infinitely more benefit than by having their work done for them by gasoline. But I rarely took exercise merely as exercise. Primarily I took it because I liked it. Play should never be allowed to interfere with work; and a life devoted merely to play is, of all forms of existence, the most dismal. But the joy of life is a very good thing, and while work is the essential in it, play also has its place
A motor boat seems more like a car (no exercise) while a dirt bike is more like riding a horse. He was very fond of polo and considered it a better sport than tennis or golf. Its interesting to see the opinions of an active man from before the aerobic and running crazes.
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Old 02-22-2014, 10:17 AM   #2
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An honest assesment of his attitudes about conservation and wild spaces, leads me to beleive that Mr. Roosevelt would still prefer to ride a horse.
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Old 02-22-2014, 10:44 AM   #3
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He would either ride a Harley or a KLR.












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Old 02-22-2014, 11:49 AM   #4
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He'd have been a stunta'!

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Old 02-22-2014, 12:04 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by k-moe View Post
An honest assesment of his attitudes about conservation and wild spaces, leads me to beleive that Mr. Roosevelt would still prefer to ride a horse.
Interesting. He was a conservatinist and not a preservationist like Muir. I guess that makes me think he might be open to the idea of a dirt bike. But you do have a point. Maybe he'd be a mountain biker or whitewater kayaker.
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Old 02-22-2014, 01:17 PM   #6
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While I also admired the man for some of the things he accomplished, after studying a bit more about him, I'm not so sure he was the great man everyone purports him to be.

One author has his Imperialistic views setting the stage for WWII. Others bring forth compelling evidence calling into question his time spent in the "West", and some go so far as to call bullshit.

Not everyone views history thru rose-colored glasses, apparently.
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Old 02-22-2014, 01:33 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Motomedic View Post
While I also admired the man for some of the things he accomplished, after studying a bit more about him, I'm not so sure he was the great man everyone purports him to be.

One author has his Imperialistic views setting the stage for WWII. Others bring forth compelling evidence calling into question his time spent in the "West", and some go so far as to call bullshit.

Not everyone views history thru rose-colored glasses, apparently.
"Compelling evidence"? Oh, for fuck's sake...


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Old 02-22-2014, 01:53 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motomedic View Post
While I also admired the man for some of the things he accomplished, after studying a bit more about him, I'm not so sure he was the great man everyone purports him to be.

One author has his Imperialistic views setting the stage for WWII. Others bring forth compelling evidence calling into question his time spent in the "West", and some go so far as to call bullshit.

Not everyone views history thru rose-colored glasses, apparently.
he also had the nasty "the only good indian is a dead indian" attitude

not sure how he got his face carved in a mountain with 3 other land surveyors
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Old 02-22-2014, 02:07 PM   #9
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The Imperial Cruise

http://www.newrepublic.com/article/b...on-progressive


Teddy Roosevelt Is No Model for a President

By David Boaz

Cato senior fellow Jim Powell, author of Bully Boy: The Truth about Theodore Roosevelt’s Legacy, writes at Forbes.com today that TR is a bad model for President Obama:
Theodore Roosevelt was the man who, in 1906, encouraged progressives to promote a federal income tax after it was struck down by the Supreme Court and given up for dead. He declared that “too much cannot be said against the men of great wealth.” He vowed to “punish certain malefactors of great wealth.”
Perhaps TR’s view was rooted in an earlier era when the greatest fortunes were made by providing luxuries for kings, like fine furniture, tapestries, porcelains and works of silver, gold and jewels. Since the rise of industrial capitalism, however, the greatest fortunes generally have been made by serving millions of ordinary people. One thinks of the Wrigley chewing gum fortune, the Heinz pickle fortune, the Havemeyer sugar fortune, the Shields shaving cream fortune, the Colgate toothpaste fortune, the Ford automobile fortune and, more recently, the Jobs Apple fortune. TR inherited money from his family’s glass-importing and banking businesses, and maybe his hostility to capitalist wealth was driven by guilt.
Like Obama, TR was a passionate believer in big government – actually the first president to promote it since the Civil War. He said, “I believe in power…I did greatly broaden the use of executive power…The biggest matters I managed without consultation with anyone, for when a matter is of capital importance, it is well to have it handled by one man only …I don’t think that any harm comes from the concentration of power in one man’s hands.”
Also like Obama, TR was almost entirely focused on politics – personalities, speeches, publicity and so on. He seemed to be concerned about an economic issue only when it became a big problem, particularly if it was big enough to affect the next election. There wasn’t much evidence of long-term thinking beyond the next election. Certainly there was no evident awareness of unintended consequences.

Off to CSM in 3...2...
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Old 02-22-2014, 02:20 PM   #10
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bloody thing won't let me quote Motomedic...

regardless I have the book The Imperial Cruise.

nothing I have read in this thread or any published piece sways my opinion of Teddy Roosevelt as one of my favorite Americans.

he is one whom I have quoted numerous times in signature lines of various forum accounts.

that said, no one is perfect nor fits my ideal.
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Old 02-22-2014, 02:25 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by firstlog View Post
I greatly admire Teddy Roosevelt. He was a man's man, hunter, fisher, conservationist, boxer, athlete, soldier, statesman.

Personally, I think he would have loved the physical challenge of hard off road riding. I can see him on a 250 2 stroke hitting the mountain trails.



A motor boat seems more like a car (no exercise) while a dirt bike is more like riding a horse. He was very fond of polo and considered it a better sport than tennis or golf. Its interesting to see the opinions of an active man from before the aerobic and running crazes.

depends the age... the later Teddy would've been more suited to a big pig. something along the lines of an R1150GS. earlier... KTM 530EXC or Husky of sorts.
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Old 02-22-2014, 03:32 PM   #12
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Don't get me wrong, he did have his good points too. I still consider him to one of our better leaders.

It's just that my interest in TR showed me once again exactly how much our opinions and ideas are influenced by what we are told/read, without regard for the truth, and that the truth isn't necessarily in the obvious places.

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Old 02-22-2014, 03:36 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motomedic View Post
Theodore Roosevelt was the man who, in 1906, encouraged progressives to promote a federal income tax after it was struck down by the Supreme Court and given up for dead. He declared that “too much cannot be said against the men of great wealth.” He vowed to “punish certain malefactors of great wealth.”
Keep in mind, that this was a time when "robber barons" ruled the country, the Sherman Anti-Trust act was pretty new, and monopolies were a really big problem.
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Old 02-22-2014, 03:49 PM   #14
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Okay, no more CSM crap from me...

He'd ride a Harley, of course.
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Old 02-22-2014, 06:14 PM   #15
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Or an Indian

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