ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > Regional forums > The Sandbox - AKA Flatistan
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-27-2014, 06:23 AM   #31
motomike14
Thumper Crusader
 
motomike14's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: Florida
Oddometer: 1,610
You just gotta ride sand as often as possible to learn to deal with it. I'm convinced you can never truly master it as conditions will always change, but pointers I've picked up last 20+ years from my old man and other faster riders;

1) Sit back on the seat, hug the tank with your knees, and stay loose with your arms. Front end is going to dance around no matter what; just let it do it's thing.
2) Steady throttle; if you start chopping on/off, you lose your momentum, and if you chop the throttle real hard, that's when the rear wheel stands dancing erratically.
3) Pick a line, stay in a line. Don't try to go over the middle where it's super soft. More often than not, I see people lose the front by dancing around side to side.
4) When cornering, slide up on the seat, let the front end dig it, then square it out with the rear wheel/throttle. The rear will find traction before the front
5) Get your suspension set right. If the rear end is dancing around a lot, look into softening up the dampning portion or possible change the sag.

Not sure what adjustments you have in the WRR suspension. But, everyone is telling me suspension investment is worth more than the steering dampner.
__________________
"The bold adventurer succeeds the best. - Ovid

I drink the koolaid too...just not the orange kind.
motomike14 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2014, 07:59 AM   #32
Dr.Z
6Sigma Knuckle Shflr
 
Dr.Z's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2006
Location: Central FL
Oddometer: 9,721
Dammit, this whole time, I've been using the force to get through sand camp.
__________________
Stay half-assed, my friends. -- Mike West

He's got some of the basics down, but, in the end, that just has to create a bigger clusterfuck in that chinese fire drill of a cognitive thought he brought to the dog and pony show of his new found awareness. - Jack Goff
Dr.Z is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2014, 11:26 AM   #33
Vico1
Takin' it Easy
 
Vico1's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2008
Location: Ft Walton Beach FL
Oddometer: 5,538
Attack!

The trick to riding sand it to always attack it. Aggressively. Power is your friend.

You don't have to go fast! If you are already going warp speed when you hit the sand you will have to chop the throttle and that means death. I will often slow down and drop a gear before hitting the really deep stuff.

If you think you can ride sand and then relax the bitch (all sand everywhere) will whip you down in a heart beat. I got the broken bones to prove it... and some good videos along the way too...

Still - give me sand over rock gardens anyday...

OH yea - IMHO Mike is right - suspension dollars give you the best bang for the buck.
__________________
KTM 500 EXC Yellow Vee Black DR650
A few others in the past

You dont quit riding when you get old, you get old when you quit riding.
I don't always ride street bikes, but when I do I prefer VStroms
Vico1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2014, 12:56 PM   #34
nevermind
Swamp Thing
 
nevermind's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Lost then Found
Oddometer: 2,694
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vico1 View Post
The trick to riding sand it to always attack it. Aggressively. Power is your friend.

You don't have to go fast! If you are already going warp speed when you hit the sand you will have to chop the throttle and that means death. I will often slow down and drop a gear before hitting the really deep stuff.

The ONLY trick I've found so far is keeping the front end light. This does not mean "go fast, balls out"! It means apply just enough power to keep the front end dancing. Steering gets a tad heavy? Add a small, incremental twist of power. Seeing the good sand riders at 70 mph ripping through the deep sugar is cool and very foreign to me right now. Maybe some day, but for now I'm just trying to keep the front end light...
nevermind is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2014, 04:43 PM   #35
waybill
cheap thrill
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Location: N. Fla.
Oddometer: 611
Henry clearing the log earlier

__________________
Bill

1150Adv, 950Adv, 800GS, TR650, DR350
waybill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2014, 09:49 PM   #36
HenryFL OP
Old: Molly
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Location: NE Florida
Oddometer: 98
I much prefer this action to the whole laying in the dirt in pain thing Bill... thanks for posting !

Was a fun day up till the get off.
__________________
2013 WR250R

Past: DR-Z400SM, XT225, KX250, CR125, CR250, RM125
HenryFL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2014, 01:40 PM   #37
BikePilot
Beastly Adventurer
 
BikePilot's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2005
Location: Tampa
Oddometer: 11,171
doh! that's some bad luck. Heal up and get back at it. FWIW I've been riding dirt bikes quickly, but badly (lots of crashing), for 20yrs and so far haven't broken anything substantial (just fractures ribs, but as long as a bone doesn't break all the way through it doesn't count ), so don't think this is the sort of injury you are guaranteed to have with great frequency.
__________________
'09 Buell XB12XT, TL1000S, H1F, M620, CR250R, KX100, XR650R, Cota 315R

Summer 2009 Ride Report http://advrider.com/forums/showthrea...1509c&t=507038
Summer 2008 RR. http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=367703
BikePilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2014, 03:23 PM   #38
Philip Kuntz
Fleasy Rider
 
Philip Kuntz's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Location: Central FL
Oddometer: 4,654
Heal up quick, Henry! Its a good time to order some bark busters.
Philip Kuntz is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2014, 06:10 PM   #39
HenryFL OP
Old: Molly
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Location: NE Florida
Oddometer: 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philip Kuntz View Post
Heal up quick, Henry! Its a good time to order some bark busters.
Have a couple pair. None fit. Too much junk on the bars where they mount. I will have to get the kind that mount down on the triple.
__________________
2013 WR250R

Past: DR-Z400SM, XT225, KX250, CR125, CR250, RM125
HenryFL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2014, 06:31 PM   #40
highlux
Adventurer
 
Joined: Feb 2014
Oddometer: 15
Sorry about your collar bone. Hope all goes well in your recovery.

That being said. I think all riders should look into proper ways to take a fall.
It's served me well in life, being able to "roll" at a moments notice...I just kinda instinctively do it at this point. I know the worst thing to do is just stick an arm out to catch yourself...which is what most do. Also eating the ground with a shoulder I bet is what snaps that collar bone.

I know each crash is different and happen fast. I can honestly say...I have avoided some damage just from learning a little about falling.

Maybe something worth checking out. Doesn't always work...as my silly butt broke my own ankle in my front yard a few years ago tripping on the curb...but if it works once it's worth it.

A gymnastics person or a judo guy would be a good source for learning to fall. My Father in law taught judo in WW2. He showed me a couple things.
highlux is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2014, 05:16 AM   #41
Vico1
Takin' it Easy
 
Vico1's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2008
Location: Ft Walton Beach FL
Oddometer: 5,538
Quote:
Originally Posted by highlux View Post
I think all riders should look into proper ways to take a fall.
It's served me well in life, being able to "roll" at a moments notice...I just kinda instinctively do it at this point. I know the worst thing to do is just stick an arm out to catch yourself...which is what most do. Also eating the ground with a shoulder I bet is what snaps that collar bone.
Totally agree here. Tuck and roll ASAP after ejection. Do NOT stick out your hands to brace the fall. huge mistake

Also, I totally recommend a really good set of bark busters - however - in an over the bars crash they can wack your hands pretty good. I have broken bones in both hands (a different times of course) from hitting bark busters on the way out of the cockpit.

Good padded gloves help some.

Here's a good trick for completely avoiding all motorcycle related injuries... STAY AT HOME ON THE COUCH.

That simply doesn't work for me and I suspect few on this thread will take up that recommendation.
__________________
KTM 500 EXC Yellow Vee Black DR650
A few others in the past

You dont quit riding when you get old, you get old when you quit riding.
I don't always ride street bikes, but when I do I prefer VStroms
Vico1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2014, 06:12 AM   #42
nevermind
Swamp Thing
 
nevermind's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Location: Lost then Found
Oddometer: 2,694
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vico1 View Post
Here's a good trick for completely avoiding all motorcycle related injuries... STAY AT HOME ON THE COUCH.

That simply doesn't work for me and I suspect few on this thread will take up that recommendation.
LOL!!!

My Ortho tried that line on my last week! Told him I'm not sitting at home and getting old and fat, I will ride!!!
nevermind is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2014, 04:24 PM   #43
woodsatyr
Kitty Boy
 
woodsatyr's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Location: NE FL
Oddometer: 438
Geez, I got pitched on the ground so hard and so fast there was no way to tuck and roll or anything else. It was SLAP! SLAP! BAM! Tank slapper and hit the ground. Sometimes excrement occurs.
woodsatyr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2014, 05:13 PM   #44
motomike14
Thumper Crusader
 
motomike14's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2010
Location: Florida
Oddometer: 1,610
We were talking about this Saturday night at dinner in CK on the CADS ride. If the rear kicks out, stay in that throttle. low slide > high side. Sure enough on Sunday while winding through some fun limerock roads, rear end on my XR decided to go for a slide...and a big one. I rememebered what I learned at a track day at Jennings; stay in the throttle, then lean it down for tuck and roll or just slide. Well, I decided to slide, as did the bike.

Cycra bar busters did their job; gear shifter bent and new scratch on the tank, but I got right up and rode away.

Frankly, no matter how experienced, safe, and protected we are, shit happens. That's why it makes the ride so much fun when you make it.
__________________
"The bold adventurer succeeds the best. - Ovid

I drink the koolaid too...just not the orange kind.
motomike14 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2014, 05:44 PM   #45
Vico1
Takin' it Easy
 
Vico1's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2008
Location: Ft Walton Beach FL
Oddometer: 5,538
We were on a ride this weekend and a rider on a KLR went down hard after triple slide in mud. He was "out" for over 5 minutes and scared the shit out of all of us. Just before EMRs arrived he started to come out of it. Opted not to ride to ER but we would not let him ride back. I got truck and he rode back with me. Experienced solid rider. Yep shit happens.
__________________
KTM 500 EXC Yellow Vee Black DR650
A few others in the past

You dont quit riding when you get old, you get old when you quit riding.
I don't always ride street bikes, but when I do I prefer VStroms
Vico1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 04:30 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014