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Old 03-18-2014, 05:35 PM   #16
flei
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My theory is similar to others: do not tense up, look where I want the bike to go, move my weight back to lighten the front wheel, gas it. In practice, I find getting tense and thinking "oh oh" usually results in an "oh oh". If I stay relaxed, the rest of the technique seems to occur naturally and I ride it out.
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Old 03-18-2014, 09:09 PM   #17
ObiJohn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StorckWhip View Post
I'll take this all into account, thanks! I elected to enter the rut just to 'see.' Well, now I feel like I need to go back and get it right! I'm sticking with standing up though as I'm afraid of being crushed under 600lbs of Tenere.
IMO it would be a lot better, cheaper, and safer, to practice this sort of thing with a 250 lb. dirt bike than a 600 lb. adventure bike.

I'll go further out on a limb... these big adventure bikes (with the possible exception of the KTM 990/1190) are really not dirt bikes on steroids, they're street bikes with long-travel suspension and high ground clearance. They're not meant for serious single-track (although people have done it), or MX-style riding (although people have done it). They're meant so that tourers can take dirt roads and reasonable two-tracks. If a 600 lb. bike lands on you it is going to hurt... you and the bike are going to get broken.

My theory on riding is to learn how to handle this stuff in a safe environment, e.g., class, but try to avoid as much of it as possible in the real world (out in the boonies). Air ambulances are very expensive.
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Old 03-18-2014, 09:23 PM   #18
jonz
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Avoid the rut if possible. If not, learn to love the rut. Commit to the rut and stay in it until you either stop or the rut ends. If the rut is deep/steep enough and you try to ride out of it on the gas has been suggested, frequently your front tire makes it out but the rear stays in and you will be doing a little air time.

Sometimes, you're just leaning the wrong way (i.e. the rut goes one way and you're leaning the other) and you're going to go down. The slower you hit the ground, the better in that case and just pick the softest place to land.
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Old 03-18-2014, 09:48 PM   #19
NERVE
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Bike View Post
You mostly likely sneaked a peek at the side of the rut and where your eyes go, so goes the bike and you clipped the side. When I'm on stuff like that I only look where the bike needs to go; resist the temptation.
This.
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Old 03-20-2014, 12:44 PM   #20
CopaMundial
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Simple really.
Don't try to teach yourself offroad technique on a big bike.

They can be ridden very effectively by a skilled offroad rider, but trying to teach yourself on a big bike is asking for trouble in the form of expensive repairs to either your bike or your body.

Take the easy 1-day MSF Dirtbike School. They loan you a nice light bike to learn some basic technique.

Then you can take some additional big-bike type training with your own bike.
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Old 03-21-2014, 07:15 AM   #21
foxtrapper
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I suppose we could ask the OP to clarify the type of rut he got caught in. For it certainly is true that how you handle a deep rut is different from how you handle a shallow one. I was thinking shallow ruts when I made my comment.
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Old 03-21-2014, 07:48 PM   #22
gearheadE30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CopaMundial View Post
Simple really.
Don't try to teach yourself offroad technique on a big bike.

They can be ridden very effectively by a skilled offroad rider, but trying to teach yourself on a big bike is asking for trouble in the form of expensive repairs to either your bike or your body.

Take the easy 1-day MSF Dirtbike School. They loan you a nice light bike to learn some basic technique.

Then you can take some additional big-bike type training with your own bike.
See I don't really understand this. I have a 950 and an XT350. True, I learned the basics on the XT, but the 950 made me re-learn a lot of things. Some of them were things specific to big bikes, and others were just bad habits that I'd picked up along the way, but riding the 950 in places it really shouldn't be (and, yes, crashing a few times along the way) has made me a much, much better rider, on either bike. Plus, some people don't have access to a second, light bike to learn on, and I applaud the OP for actually getting out there and doing it on an S10, and trying to figure out how to do it right by asking around rather than just giving up or something.
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Old 03-22-2014, 08:55 AM   #23
folknride
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gearheadE30 View Post
See I don't really understand this. I have a 950 and an XT350. True, I learned the basics on the XT, but the 950 made me re-learn a lot of things. Some of them were things specific to big bikes, and others were just bad habits that I'd picked up along the way, but riding the 950 in places it really shouldn't be (and, yes, crashing a few times along the way) has made me a much, much better rider, on either bike. Plus, some people don't have access to a second, light bike to learn on, and I applaud the OP for actually getting out there and doing it on an S10, and trying to figure out how to do it right by asking around rather than just giving up or something.
+1
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Old 03-22-2014, 11:20 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by folknride View Post
+1
Thanks to you both. My theory is that I'm not going to try to do anything too hard or dumb, but that it's probably not going to hurt either me or the bike too badly to drop it in a grass/mud situation going 5-15mph.

To clarify, about the rut...I'm not sure, really. It struck me as being a decently deep but short rut. I'm going to go have a look at it today (and maybe ride slower through it...as that could have been part of the issue). I think the fact that it was pretty firm dried mud on both sides contributed too.

Anyway, I went out a year or so ago on a 125 dirtbike for some actual instruction at a local place that has a few dirt tracks. I had a ball, but the idea of sticking my inside leg out doesn't translate to the Tenere. Nor does jumping, using berms, or backing it in. All quite amusing on a 125 though.
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Old 03-22-2014, 12:04 PM   #25
folknride
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StorckWhip View Post
I think the fact that it was pretty firm dried mud on both sides contributed too.
Dried mud rut is what got me too. I think the bottom line on a big bike is...
Arruugah, Arruugah - avoid avoid avoid!!!!

(and assume all ruts have hard sides?)
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Old 03-22-2014, 04:28 PM   #26
CopaMundial
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gearheadE30 View Post
See I don't really understand this.
...
Quote:
Originally Posted by gearheadE30 View Post
I learned the basics on the XT, but the 950 made me re-learn a lot of things.
So then yes, you do understand it.
Learn technique on a smaller bike, then apply it to a larger bike.
Starting to ride dirt from scratch on a big bike is not the best way to go about it.
I'm not saying it's the end of the world, just that it will result in expensive repairs to your bike or your body... more so than if you learn technique on a smaller bike.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gearheadE30 View Post
Plus, some people don't have access to a second, light bike to learn on
That's why my post that you quoted mentioned MSF dirtbike school.
They provide the bike.
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Old 03-27-2014, 11:36 AM   #27
Gamequeazy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CopaMundial View Post
...


So then yes, you do understand it.
Learn technique on a smaller bike, then apply it to a larger bike.
Starting to ride dirt from scratch on a big bike is not the best way to go about it.
I'm not saying it's the end of the world, just that it will result in expensive repairs to your bike or your body... more so than if you learn technique on a smaller bike.



That's why my post that you quoted mentioned MSF dirtbike school.
They provide the bike.
I agree. I started riding offroad on an XT600, then went to a TE610, but it wasn't until I rode the hell out of my DT175 that I was able to get comfortable offroad and apply the concepts from the little bike to the big one.
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Old 03-27-2014, 12:41 PM   #28
Bajaexplorer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Bike
You mostly likely sneaked a peek at the side of the rut and where your eyes go, so goes the bike and you clipped the side. When I'm on stuff like that I only look where the bike needs to go; resist the temptation.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Gottfried View Post
This.
This again ^.
One of the rules that the teacher kept pounding into my brain.
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Old 04-01-2014, 12:26 PM   #29
doxiedog
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Just keep going,sooner or later, the rut will hold the bike up for you!
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Old 04-01-2014, 05:56 PM   #30
XR650L_Dave
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I hate ruts.

One key is to allow the bike to move a bit laterally under you, if you are death-gripping with your knees if the bike gets flicked a bit L or R the bike will flick you.

Another useful method is to move your feet so the balls of your feet are on the pegs, makes it easier to handle/absorb the movement when the bike gets pushed sideways or it tracks sideways.
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