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Old 03-26-2014, 02:18 PM   #61
ErikDK
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Trikes as well as bikes with sidecars usually have very heavy steering, so swerving around an obstacle could be an impossible task, and might tip the vehicle over, unless it's a reverse trike.

A Piaggio MP3 tilts in curves like any other bike, but keeps its balance at slow speeds, and you can even lock the wheels vertical at standstill.

It doesn't have any gears or clutch to deal with, just twist and go.

If Suzuki built a clone of the MP3 with the Burgman 650 engine and drivetrain, it would be one hell of a ride.
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Old 03-26-2014, 02:26 PM   #62
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I have thought about that.

If I can still drive a 4x4, think I get a pre 2001 Jeep Cherokee and trick it out sort like I had my CJ5, fix it up to go rescue you young guys when you get hung up, broke down, etc.
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Old 03-26-2014, 03:55 PM   #63
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2 or 3 or 4 wheels (IMHO) makes no difference unless you have simply lost the ability to balance or to hold up a bike. If you feel your reflexes/skills/cognitive awareness are so bad you think you shouldn't ride, then you probably shouldn't be driving either. You will end up in an accident/crash no matter what motorized vehicle you are in or on. Get off the road. Take the bus.
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Old 03-26-2014, 04:08 PM   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Velocibiker View Post
2 or 3 or 4 wheels (IMHO) makes no difference unless you have simply lost the ability to balance or to hold up a bike. If you feel your reflexes/skills/cognitive awareness are so bad you think you shouldn't ride, then you probably shouldn't be driving either. You will end up in an accident/crash no matter what motorized vehicle you are in or on. Get off the road. Take the bus.


I beg to differ. It takes much more skill to operate a motorcycle than drive a car. Its the difference between piloting a pontoon boat and shooting rapids in a kayak.
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Old 03-26-2014, 04:37 PM   #65
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I had an uncle who was into motorcycles all his life. It's actually how I got into them, going in his car (we didn't have one) on a Sunday drive to watch the motorcycle racing as a small kid. He rode bikes his whole life, even his postie-bike to the local shops up until a few weeks before he left this world. I plan to be the same.

So to the question of what comes after I can no longer ride a motorcycle of any sort....... that's something people have pondered without certainty for thousands of years.
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Old 03-26-2014, 09:17 PM   #66
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I'm gonna hire a wild college chick to haul me around...moto, sidecar, or Jeep.

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Old 03-26-2014, 10:55 PM   #67
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I'm 71 and am selling my 650 Vstrom and moving to a CB500F. There is no problem riding the 'strom but parking on an uneven or loose surface was becoming a concern due to my lack of strength. Even though it's lowered I had a couple of near drops over the past few months and thought it time to get something easier to manage. When you have to worry about what the parking situation will be when you stop it takes some of the pleasure out of riding.

The CB500 is only 20 kg lighter but is lower and easier to manhandle, it's easy to ride and has "adequate" performance at least for me.

If/when I have to downsize again I'll move to something like the CBR250R.
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Old 03-27-2014, 06:05 AM   #68
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Originally Posted by Lep View Post
I'm 71 and am selling my 650 Vstrom and moving to a CB500F. There is no problem riding the 'strom but parking on an uneven or loose surface was becoming a concern due to my lack of strength. Even though it's lowered I had a couple of near drops over the past few months and thought it time to get something easier to manage. When you have to worry about what the parking situation will be when you stop it takes some of the pleasure out of riding.

The CB500 is only 20 kg lighter but is lower and easier to manhandle, it's easy to ride and has "adequate" performance at least for me.

If/when I have to downsize again I'll move to something like the CBR250R.

Do you train with weights to maintain strength?
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Old 03-27-2014, 09:26 AM   #69
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Old 03-27-2014, 02:01 PM   #70
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A big part of the appeal of riding for me is leaning in the curves and the ease with which 2 wheels and be handled. I can't see ever going to three wheels unless I loose my sense of balance in which case I'll consider a convertable car. I work out to try to maintain my physical condition. Someday I may only be handle a small scooter but I'll still be out riding on 2 wheels.

BTW, one of my current bikes is a 150cc scooter and it is an absolute blast to ride.
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Old 03-28-2014, 12:27 PM   #71
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youre so old your sentences all end in what?
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Old 03-28-2014, 06:57 PM   #72
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If they can find enough of the pieces then I guess they bury me.


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Old 03-29-2014, 09:26 PM   #73
Lep
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motoracer51 View Post
Do you train with weights to maintain strength?
Off topic but to answer your question.
I was a gym regular for few years then some heart irregularities showed up on the treadmill heart monitor. Investigation showed I had Tachycardia problem (NSVT) and a cardioogist advised me to reduce my level of exertion. Eventually the Tachycardia problem was fixed with a double ablation but I still have other heart issues and I just never got back to the gym.

Even when I was training regularly three times a week I found the Vstrom heavy (I'm the original 9 stone weakling) and it doesn't help that I also have recurring shoulder problems.

I wrote all that to draw attention to the fact that heart irregularities can exist without any noticeable symptoms. Had I not been paying atention to the pulse rate monitor on the treadmill I might not have noticed the irregularity. I told the cardiologist I regretted finding out because it made it impossible for me to get medical insurance for a planned trip to the US. His response was whether I noticed it or not the tachycardia could still have killed me if it became sustained.

I may resume some light gym activities but don't expect that to increase my strength by much, it never did previously.

Lep screwed with this post 03-29-2014 at 09:28 PM Reason: Tidy up
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Old 03-30-2014, 05:16 AM   #74
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lep View Post
Off topic but to answer your question.
I was a gym regular for few years then some heart irregularities showed up on the treadmill heart monitor. Investigation showed I had Tachycardia problem (NSVT) and a cardioogist advised me to reduce my level of exertion. Eventually the Tachycardia problem was fixed with a double ablation but I still have other heart issues and I just never got back to the gym.

Even when I was training regularly three times a week I found the Vstrom heavy (I'm the original 9 stone weakling) and it doesn't help that I also have recurring shoulder problems.

I wrote all that to draw attention to the fact that heart irregularities can exist without any noticeable symptoms. Had I not been paying atention to the pulse rate monitor on the treadmill I might not have noticed the irregularity. I told the cardiologist I regretted finding out because it made it impossible for me to get medical insurance for a planned trip to the US. His response was whether I noticed it or not the tachycardia could still have killed me if it became sustained.

I may resume some light gym activities but don't expect that to increase my strength by much, it never did previously.
Try a scooter. The mass is low, the steering is light, and the performance might surprise you. I was found to have a constant atrial fib, but I never noticed any problem operating my scooter.
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Old 03-30-2014, 07:07 AM   #75
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Critical Mass

For many years I have been aghast at the size and weight of the motorcycles modern riders are willing to throw a leg over. During the 1980s I started noticing a lot of short stocky people on Goldwings, and saw some really heavy cruisers. I remember a young man on a Yamaha 1100 (I think) who told me he had a special stand he used at traffic lights because the bike was heavy to hold up. These days I see older men and small women piloting motorcycles I would not care to ride, because they are unnecessarily heavy, and challenging to maneuver in less than ideal circumstances. I have seen how riders can lose control of the massive machines at low speed and when trying to park on imperfect pavement. I know a man who gave up his Goldwing after his wife died. He never realized that he couldn't move it without her on the back helping until it fell over on him in his driveway. He was pinned under it and required some neighbors to get it off him. I have seen old guys on huge tourers with training wheels, and lots of tricycles. Is the 1000cc+ displacement that important? There are lightweight machines that are fun to ride, and can go fast. I am strong enough to ride a large machine, having done manual labor all my life, but I don't care to ride a really heavy 2 wheeler.
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