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Old 03-27-2014, 09:51 PM   #16
Solarbronco
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Man, your life is a movie, you are in the starring role and the movie only plays once. Once, that's it. Make it a good one. Live a safe and careful life and I promise you will lay in your deathbed regretting it someday.

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Old 03-27-2014, 10:04 PM   #17
rpcraft
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I've fallen off loads and maybe I have a damaged thought processing unit, but the thought of not getting on a bike or not riding again has honestly never never crossed my mind. I do not ride nearly as much as I wish I could, but every day I don't and get to wherever it is I was going in my truck (or whatever means I used) my first thought is, Damn I should have rode the bike...

Do what you feel is best for yourself. If someone else is nagging at you about it, then consider this... How much are you willing to comprimise on other things, because eventually you will end up in that boat. I'm 42 this year, and I learned a long time ago that people who do not appreciate your dreams, desires, and individuality are always going to do their best to sway you into doing what is in their best interest and I have zero time to deal with that. I try to be considerate of others, but in the end, I have to be true to myself, and riding has been in my blood since I was a tiny tot. It will always be an urge and the compulsion to get the f out of dodge, log some miles, and leave behind the worries, will always be part of my core. Ask yourself why you ride, and what it is that compells you. As others have said, if it is just a passing fancy then it might be best for you to stop. I just know I never could stop. I have quit smoking and drinking cold turkey, did it 12 years ago, and will power is the only reason I was able to. Riding isn't something I could quit.
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Old 03-28-2014, 12:13 AM   #18
fullmetalscooter
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It s risky to ride and that a fact. If you wear All the gear , All the time no matter what you can be safer. You may even want to go back and take a training course or a track day course to improve you skills . It will may make you feel safer. Yet no mater what it's always going to be a case of when and why are you going down.

If you got hit because of someone else that's one thing. If If you went down due to speed etc then training can help. You ll only going to live once and even if you don't ride your chance are 1 in 33 of living to a ripe old age.
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Old 03-28-2014, 01:14 AM   #19
PeterW
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You'll die anyway.

If you don't enjoy riding quit, if you do, well, your call, but I know the decision I made.

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Old 03-28-2014, 01:14 AM   #20
USMC_Engineer
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I gave up riding for the last 6 months…..

It was a decision that I made along with my family after I totaled my GSA (my dream bike btw) and pretty much walked away from (was extremely lucky).

Thing was,

For the last 6 months all I could think about was getting out there again and the pleasure that riding did for me. There is nothing like it, I just could not fathom Not riding again…

so after honest conversations with my significant other and mutual understanding I am now back in the saddle and picked up my brand new bike today ('14 DRZ400SM).

If you do decide to saddle up again, you have the miles under your belt to understand that shit can happen, but do what you can to minimize the bad stuff, ride defensively aka like your invisible but dress visible and ATGATT, know your limits, pay attention…etc…etc…

Do I think of what could have happened?, of course! Do I Miss my fallen brothers that have wrecked and are now riding in heaven? Of course, every day!

Best wishes with which ever route you decide...
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Old 03-28-2014, 08:18 PM   #21
Jimbabwe
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I broke a hip in a crash about twenty five years ago. I too was seriously questioning my 'desire' to ride again, especially when it started raining the day I rode my bike home from the repair shop.
That was about 350,000 miles ago, and I still smile every morning when I ride into work, rain or shine.
Do what your heart tells you is the right thing, I did and I am thankful every ride...
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Old 03-28-2014, 11:04 PM   #22
ObiJohn
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No one gets out of life alive. Doesn't mean we should hasten the end, either. Yes, there is risk involved, but your actions and decisions will either amplify or minimize the risk. Why did you crash? Did your actions contribute to it? Before I'd give up riding, I'd think about why I crashed, and what I'd do differently from now on (besides not riding). The only failure is failing to learn from our experiences.

I find that as I get older, I ride (and drive) more sedately. I'm not going to pass when it's risky. I'm going to give the people ahead of me a little extra space. I'm not going to push curves as much. If I really get on the throttle, it's when I'm on a straight stretch of highway out in the boonies where I can see a long way. I don't ride at night or in bad weather. In short, I'm not riding on the edge any more, and instead try to minimize the chances of something bad occurring by reducing my exposure to risky situations.

I also bit the bullet and bought what I thought was the most protective gear... Motoport with their quad armor. Along with good boots, gloves, and helmet. I figure if I go down and slide/bounce around, I won't be seriously hurt. Of course, if I slam into anything (car, guardrail, etc.) then all bets are off. But good gear should minimize the risk of injury from a get-off.

All you can do is all you can do. You could be the guy stuck in your car on the way to work on a city street, and then a helicopter crashes and splashes you with burning jet fuel (as happened last week in Seattle). Fat lot of good not riding a motorcycle did that poor guy.
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Old 03-28-2014, 11:20 PM   #23
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Why you totaled your bike is important. Some people insist that they were meant to ride, that they would be incomplete without it, and that they figure "I'm going to die anyway" so WTF.

But if you pretzeled your bike because of an incident involving alcohol, for instance, I would agree, you're better off without it.

Motorcycling, to the extent you've pursued it, is not a casual pastime. If you plan to continue, ask yourself, "Can I do this with due regard for the risks it entails?" If not, then walk away while you still can.

Just my $.02

PS Many riders experience a "over confident" period shortly after they take up riding. There is no generally accepted time when this occurs and it might have been something you have just come through. (I had a similar experience that briefly shook my commitment.) Is it possible that this was a factor in your accident?

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Old 03-28-2014, 11:50 PM   #24
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My accident was caused by my own stupidity. I passed on a double yellow and a car came out of an intersection and hit me. I shouldn't have been passing there with bad visibility and that's all there is to it.

This thread has helped me focus on what really happened. I was careless and reckless. The accident could have been prevented if I didn't pass where I shouldn't have.

I have decided to continue riding but to do so more carefully. I will be beginning the search for a Ducati Multistrada this week. I'll be the rider in the Portland area on a Multi who refuses to pass on double yellows. :)
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Old 03-29-2014, 04:51 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyParker51 View Post
My accident was caused by my own stupidity. I passed on a double yellow and a car came out of an intersection and hit me. I shouldn't have been passing there with bad visibility and that's all there is to it.

This thread has helped me focus on what really happened. I was careless and reckless. The accident could have been prevented if I didn't pass where I shouldn't have.

I have decided to continue riding but to do so more carefully. I will be beginning the search for a Ducati Multistrada this week. I'll be the rider in the Portland area on a Multi who refuses to pass on double yellows. :)
That was easy. First, or second gen multi?
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Old 03-29-2014, 05:06 AM   #26
tkent02
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Been riding forever. Seems extremely safe to me, but it's what I grew up with. Just now I'm off work for three months because I fell off a three foot step ladder while working on my Jeep.

The risks of riding are extreme?

I don't think so. The risks of living are extreme.
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Old 03-29-2014, 09:56 AM   #27
Kommando
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tkent02 View Post
Been riding forever. Seems extremely safe to me, but it's what I grew up with. Just now I'm off work for three months because I fell off a three foot step ladder while working on my Jeep.

The risks of riding are extreme?

I don't think so. The risks of living are extreme.
Yup. Living kills all of us eventually, even if we do it by curling up on the couch in the fetal position.
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Old 03-29-2014, 10:31 AM   #28
anotherguy
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I don't understand why someone will get into a serious automobile accident and not even blink getting into a car for the ride home from the hospital. yet change that vehicle and it's a totally different story.
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Old 03-29-2014, 10:54 AM   #29
DudeClone
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no one can make this decision far you. its too personal, really. even though you have been riding it is still as if a newbie is asking "should i ride a motorcycle?" can't say yes or no, really. just if you want to, yeah

imo don't let a girlfriend or family color your decision. this is a singular choice. YOU either ride or you don't, and let the chips for where they may. for those in our lives who don't ride? well, they don't ride. if you think you want to make that choice along with them, fine. but imo i would not. this is your life to share with them. if riding is part of your life they will understand, as will you. its just a fact of your life

3 years and 60,000 miles is a good amount of riding. i am pretty sure you are getting back on the horse. at least to know for certain what level of fear or apprehension you have. your injuries while painful and scary to some, are somewhat minor (sounds like). you will be getting over that pretty soon, i would think

after that its all emotional and mental imo. and the situation of your accident will come into consideration, too. but i say get back on imo, and easy does it at first if need be. i think the answer will come soon enough if honest with yourself

whatever your decision let it be your own, and good luck

a favorite video of mine. just a reminder

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Old 03-29-2014, 11:05 AM   #30
Colorado_Rider
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Riding a motorcycle is a risk vs reward activity, I stopped when I thought I'd found someone I wanted to spend the rest of my life with. When the whore dumped me I went back to bikes and love them now more than ever.
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