ADVrider

Go Back   ADVrider > Riding > The perfect line and other riding myths
User Name
Password
Register Inmates Photos Site Rules Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-08-2014, 01:25 PM   #1
LoopGaroo OP
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Location: Friendly Humboldt Park, Chicago, IL
Oddometer: 171
Getting tired really fast while standing up riding off road

I've read that standing up while riding off road is a energy-conserving position and my friends tell me that I'll be a better rider if I stand up more.

But, I'm getting really tired, really fast while I'm doing it. I must be doing something wrong! After about 20 mins of riding my knees and quads start to get shaky and really tired. The next day I feel like I climbed the staircase of a skyscaper.

I'm not unfit- i bike 10 miles and walk 2 miles a day. I'm not overweight.

But, I am a new rider on a pretty big bike. So, I think I must be doing something wrong.

Do I need be doing specific exercises to help my upper legs, or is it related to technique? I'm have a couple BIG dual sort days coming up this autumn and I'm starting to get worried about finishing...
LoopGaroo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 01:30 PM   #2
Marine By Choice
Sergeant 0311
 
Joined: Apr 2012
Location: Winlock, Washington
Oddometer: 178
Sounds like your technique is a little off. Do you have handlebar risers installed? Makes a huge difference I believe. One should be able to stand without flexing the knees and should be comfortable.

On my recent 7,500 mile Alaska trip I wad standing on the pegs at leadt 10% of the time. Actually was more restful than sitting when my rear started getting sore.

Good luck!
Marine By Choice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 02:01 PM   #3
81forest
Studly Adventurer
 
81forest's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle
Oddometer: 592
I know the feeling. There are two kinds of standing on the pegs: attack mode and just standing. Attack mode legs are more bent at the knee, but most of the time the knee should be almost straight, according to dirt guru Shane Watts. If your bars are too low, which is most often the case, it will be impossible to find a truly comfortable standing position.

No one, not even pros, can maintain that bent-knee attack mode stance forever. Starts to feel like those wall-sit contests in middle school.
Have you seen the enduro cross training techniques thread? Fantastic enduro tips in there.
81forest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 02:05 PM   #4
motif
Gnarly Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2014
Oddometer: 126
but who says you have to stand up all he time offroad???
motif is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 02:06 PM   #5
ZEmann
want to be riding
 
ZEmann's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2013
Location: Arizona
Oddometer: 640
I agree with the risers suggestion and even the who says you need to stand all the time

but some will bitch about risers etc and say you need to adjust your body

I disagree and it took me a while to dial My xr in to my 6'4" frame
and get rid of the bent knee hunched back stance that would take it's toll
on me
ZEmann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 02:08 PM   #6
81forest
Studly Adventurer
 
81forest's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle
Oddometer: 592
Quote:
Originally Posted by motif View Post
but who says you have to stand up all he time offroad???
You don't have to, but you should if you want to go faster.
81forest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 02:09 PM   #7
matty86suk
Adventurer
 
Joined: Mar 2014
Oddometer: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by 81forest View Post
I know the feeling. There are two kinds of standing on the pegs: attack mode and just standing. Attack mode legs are more bent at the knee, but most of the time the knee should be almost straight, according to dirt guru Shane Watts. If your bars are too low, which is most often the case, it will be impossible to find a truly comfortable standing position.

No one, not even pros, can maintain that bent-knee attack mode stance forever. Starts to feel like those wall-sit contests in middle school.
Have you seen the enduro cross training techniques thread? Fantastic enduro tips in there.
This^^^ get bar risers and only attack the technical stuff, rest of the time stand straighter and enjoy the fresh air...don't worry about standing all the time, sit when you want, stand straight, and attack the technical stuff. Have fun!!
matty86suk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 02:11 PM   #8
micky1
Adventurer
 
Joined: Aug 2014
Location: Bath. UK
Oddometer: 32
Wicked

do some squats...grow some glutes and quads! lazy toad
micky1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 02:19 PM   #9
81forest
Studly Adventurer
 
81forest's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle
Oddometer: 592
Quote:
Originally Posted by micky1 View Post
do some squats...grow some glutes and quads! lazy toad
81forest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 03:02 PM   #10
Crisis management
Latte riders FTW!
 
Crisis management's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Location: New Zealand
Oddometer: 1,414
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoopGaroo View Post
But, I am a new rider on a pretty big bike. So, I think I must be doing something wrong.
I doubt you are doing anything wrong but you are probably extremely tense trying to cope with all the new stuff to do, slow down, sit down and relax. When everything is new we expend a huge amount of energy trying to cope with all the new inputs and trying to get muscles to do something they are unused to.
Learn to ride the bike a bit at a time, since all of it is new to you don't push yourself, try something and when you get tired stop and have a rest. The worst thing you can do is to try too hard, get tired and crash, that usually hurts.

Specifics: 10 miles bicycle riding is what, 16kms, 40 minutes riding? That's great if it's up steep hills but bugger all for fitness if it's on the flat, get fit, you will need all your core strength for chucking the bike around.

I would ignore bar risers at this stage, set the bike up for sitting, get the controls where you need them and get used to that, do some miles on the bike.
Think about why you stand, on the adventure bike (commonly known as the fat pig) you only need to stand for technical stuff, if its gravel roads and easy 4x4 tracks you won't need to. You need to stand when you have met an obstacle / surface that requires greater control of the bikes movement so you need to be in the attack position, knees bent, elbows bent and body low on the bike.
Riding around standing upright is fun but does absolutely nothing apart from getting some air around your head and arse.
Personally, I wouldn't worry about bar risers, I prefer flatter, narrower bars for when you need to have good front end control but everyone seems to go through the bar riser stage so give it a go and see if it works for you.

Best thing you can do is lots of easy rides to gain confidence and experience, enjoy yourself!
__________________
Orange...cause it makes me look like I know what I'm doing!
Crisis management is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 03:09 PM   #11
Kommando
Grumpy Young Man
 
Kommando's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2006
Location: Spacecoaster FL
Oddometer: 6,728
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoopGaroo View Post
I've read that standing up while riding off road is a energy-conserving position and my friends tell me that I'll be a better rider if I stand up more.

But, I'm getting really tired, really fast while I'm doing it. I must be doing something wrong! After about 20 mins of riding my knees and quads start to get shaky and really tired. The next day I feel like I climbed the staircase of a skyscaper.

I'm not unfit- i bike 10 miles and walk 2 miles a day. I'm not overweight.

But, I am a new rider on a pretty big bike. So, I think I must be doing something wrong.

Do I need be doing specific exercises to help my upper legs, or is it related to technique? I'm have a couple BIG dual sort days coming up this autumn and I'm starting to get worried about finishing...
Set up the ergos to fit you when standing.

Don't stand when you don't have to. I ride sitting down most of the time. I stand for things like whoops, jumps, humps, drops, logs, dips, etc.
__________________
Some are guard dogs of the flock. Some herders, search/rescue, or companions. We Devildogs are those, and also retrievers. Hell is our blazing dogpark, our frigid swimming hole. The fallen are our tennis balls. We don't leave the fallen behind, even if the master has to bring them home for us. Semper Fi, my friends.
Kommando is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 03:27 PM   #12
LittleRedToyota
Yinzer
 
LittleRedToyota's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2011
Location: Pittsburgh
Oddometer: 2,224
standing takes some getting used to. it is more tiring at first, but can be less tiring as you get used to it. i'd suggest just trying to stand for stretches at first rather than trying to stand for the whole ride. once you get a feel for it (and you develop the specific muscles used in riding a dirt bike while standing a bit), it will be easier and less tiring.

a key to standing not being tiring is to maintain your balance over the bike and "flow" with it. if standing is throwing you off balance, it is going to wear you out very quickly. that just comes with peg (not seat) time. (a good way to practice standing, imho, is to go out and pretend your bike is a trials bike. stand up and ride as slowly as you can. once you start to feel like you have good balance, try to ride over some obstacles. as you feel more and more comfortable with this, you'll want to start standing more while trail riding as it will be easier than riding sitting down in the rough stuff.)

as mentioned above, there are two standing positions. the attack position and the resting standing position. if you try to stay in the attack position all the time, you will get tired faster. standing with your legs straighter (but not locked knees--you never want to lock your knees) won't tire you out nearly as fast. in my experience, it can be less tiring than sitting in some types of terrain (stuff that is not so hard you need to be in the attack position to ride it well, but that is bumpy or slippery enough that the bike wants to dance beneath you.)

as for standing vs. sitting, i have heard more than one very fast racer say "sit when you can, stand when you have to". i try to do that. it does vary from person to person, though. i do know a couple guys who pretty much never sit, and don't get tired out. i also know a couple fast guys who pretty much never stand--though i will never figure out how they do it. for most people, though, i think that "sit when you can, stand when you have to" is the way to go. (though, while learning to ride standing, you might want to stand on some easier stuff where you could sit just to get the hang of it.)

as for bar risers, most of the top racers seem to not like them. you can get more leverage on the bars to turn quicker with the bars lower. however, if you aren't trying to shave seconds off your lap times, and are looking for all day comfort, i think they help--especially if you are on the taller side.
__________________
2009 KTM 450 xc-w (plated)
2009 DRZ400s
LittleRedToyota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 04:46 PM   #13
ErockPDX
Adventurer
 
ErockPDX's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2013
Location: Portland, Oregon
Oddometer: 89
Ergo ergo ergo like everybody has been saying--but also, as was said, new activity = new/different muscle activation. Another thing you'll probably discover is that your lower back is a wreck...stretch those hammies. You have three pairs of glutes anchoring on or near your lower back...they'll get worked in new ways too.

Squat form, bike ergo, and a little adaptation curve and you'll be GTG!
__________________
We do not rise to the occasion. We fall to our level of preparedness.

It would be ludicrous to think that we were new to this. We do this, this is what we do.
ErockPDX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 05:06 PM   #14
Maggot12
U'mmmm yeaah!!
 
Maggot12's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2010
Location: Barrie Ont
Oddometer: 3,099
Technique may be a little off, but I'd say to keep at it.
__________________
Maggot

Don't sweat the petty things; Pet the sweaty things !!!
Maggot12 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2014, 05:23 PM   #15
NJ-Brett
Brett
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Location: Southern New Jersey
Oddometer: 6,267
I only stand up when I have to, or rather, I just get my butt off the seat.
I do not stand up all the way except maybe to see something.
NJ-Brett is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Share

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

.
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


Times are GMT -7.   It's 01:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ADVrider 2011-2014