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Old 07-22-2014, 02:25 PM   #31
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Thanks Martin. If you happen to run across the guy who sold me my Guzzi say hi to him for me then whack him with your shillelagh.
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Old 07-22-2014, 02:45 PM   #32
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Day 16


Copenhagen Denmark


I'm glad I decided to spend the day in Copenhagen. It's a very nice city and it really seems dedicated to making the lives of its inhabitants pleasant. The city really deserves more than a single day especially when you spend half of that day doing laundry, then napping, then blogging, then more napping but napping mmmm.


I took yet another boat tour (It seems like I'm spending as much time on boats as my bike when you add in all the ferries) and like the last boat tour my camera battery died halfway through. I should of tried to find a second camera battery while I was here, but naps .


Still with all the laundry, blogging, and napping I still managed to walk over 12 miles today and got to see a few of the many interesting sites the city has to offer.


Since my camera battery died before the canal tour got to the Little Mermaid I'll head over there first thing in the morning and then point the Guzzi towards Sweden.


More Pictures : http://www.twowheelsgood.net/europa2014/?p=596






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Old 07-22-2014, 03:34 PM   #33
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Day 17


Copenhagen Denmark - Fagerhult Sweden


I was going to title this post 'Making frineds the Guzzi way' but a better title would be 'Better living through incompetence'.


I went to pay my respects to the Little Mermaid only to find about a dozen tour buses had beat me to it. I tried to get a picture of her in the brief lapses between groups of tourists crawling all over her.


Then I made my way across the Oresund bridge to Sweden. Various Germans, Danes, and Norwegians had told me that Sweden was flat and boring but we must not have been talking about the same Sweden (Or maybe I'm easily amused).


Anyway I was riding down a nice country road when my EFI light came on for about 5 seconds. I'm thinking damn it what's wrong with my bike now! Well the light went out and didn't come back on so I hoped for the best.
A bit later I spotted a group of sportbikes turn down a side road. It was actually the road my GPS had wanted me to go down but I had missed my turn and so had to make a u-turn to get back on track. It was a really nice twisty road and I thought I should stop and take a few pictures but on the other hand there was a group of sportbikes with a 30 second lead that needed catching. No pictures were taken and the unsuspecting quary was caught in short order. After that bit of fun the sportbikes and I went our seperate ways.


About 30 miles later I passed a little cafe with a classic American car parked out front and flying an American flag. A hundred yards or so down the road I spotted a nice church and stopped to take a picture. When I tried to restart the bike it started and immediately died. Again I hit the starter and the same thing occurred. After that the bike would just turn over and gave no hint of wanting to start. So I pushed the bike back to the little cafe and started unpacking the bike to see if I could find the problem. Checked the fuses, checked that the plugs were firing, checked for fuel and a vacuum in the tank. No luck.


At this point the owner of the Mats the owner of the Cafe Ritsy and his neighbor Peter come out to see what the problem is. There is a bike shop in this small town but the owner has just left on vacation for a week so they start making calls to the local gear heads and the local motorcycle racer shows up in his fancy BMW with his pretty girlfriend. He hits the starter button cranks open the throttle and gets the bike fired up to the growing crowds amusement. Anyways after shutting it down and trying to get it fired up again there's obviously a problem since the young racer can't get it fired back up without lots coaxing and clouds of black smoke. When the bike does start up it seems to run fine. So the suggestion is made that bad fuel was probably the culprit. That struck me as unlikely but what the heck any idea is better than no idea. The young racer then heads off and Peter takes me the local gas station to purchase some high test. I come back and with much coaxing get the bike fired up. I ride it about 10 miles up and down the local road and the bike is running great so I head to the local gas station to fill up the tank. Once again the bike refuses to start even with the help of some kindly strangers trying to bump start it. At this point I'm trying to decide if I should trade the bike in for a scooter or just set it on fire. After futzing with the bike for about 20 minutes I finally get it started and head back to the cafe. Since the EFI light isn't on I'm thinking it must be the sparkplugs so I plan on purchasing some the next morning and get a room at the cafe. Which you got to admit is pretty convenient. I then start futzing with the bike some more and I disconnect the wires for my USB port and heated gear from the battery which the young racer had pointed out were coming loose from the crimp and don't you know it the bike starts up immediately! Wooot! I take back all the horrible things I was thinking about the fine engineers at Lake Como.


Since I had already payed for the room and it was very cheap and very nice I decided to stay. The little Cafe is also chock full of 1950s Americana. I then had dinner with the Cafe owner and Peter's family which Peter graciously payed for. We swapped traveling stories and Peter told me about his charity work in the Ukraine and that the Russians had just shot down an airliner bound for Australia. I've been blissfully unaware of any happenings in the world for the last two weeks.


Later Peter, his youngest son, their dog Cognac and I all went down to the lake for a swim and I got a guided tour of a small town in Sweden.


So the moral of this story is that I may be a dumb-ass but I'm having a good time.


More Pictures : http://www.twowheelsgood.net/europa2014/?p=649





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Old 07-22-2014, 04:13 PM   #34
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Day 18


Skanes Fagerhult Sweden - Charlottenberg Sweden


The day started out great with having breakfast at the Ritsy Cafe and having my picture taken for their Facebook page. I said goodbye to Mats and Peter and his family and then headed north to Hillerstorp to take a quick look at Wild Chapparel that Peter had told me about. It's a wild west town in the middle of Sweden with Cowboys, Sioux Indians, and a Mexican Town. It was quite the sight to see so I stopped there for lunch where I had another Swedish pizza. I think if Peter had the chance he would spend his whole vacation here. It was pretty cool seeing all the Cowboys walking about but I didn't come to Europe to relive American history so I left after lunch.


I then made my way to Jonkoping at the bottom of Vaffern lake where I stopped to take some pictures and my bike again refused to start. I wept. Just kidding, I shook my fist in rage and screamed "You Italian bastards I'm going to beat the crap out of everyone of you spaghetti bending " then I wept. Just kidding, I put the choke on full and applied some throttle like I learned yesterday and got the bike fired up. The bike worked great for the rest of the day including multiple restarts until I pulled into camp and then it wouldn't start again. Arrrrgh!


I'll try again in the morning.


More Pictures : http://www.twowheelsgood.net/europa2014/?p=689






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Old 07-22-2014, 04:56 PM   #35
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Day 19


Charlottenberg Sweden - Trondheim Norway


I spent last night at a campsight trying to diagnose the problem with my bike. While I found plenty of information on Guzzis with starting issues none of them matched mine. I located a Guzzi dealer only 150 Kilometers away back the way I came and I also located one in Trondheim Norway where I wanted to go.


After I packed up all my camping gear I hit the magic button and the bike started up immediately. I rode 10 miles west or so into Norway to fill up with gas and the bike again refused to start.


The bike runs great once it starts and I've now figured out the trick to get it started so I pointed the bike Northwest towards Trondheim.


The ride to Trondheim was nothing less than beautiful and most of the time it followed a series of lake and streams. I would have stopped to take more pictures but it's hard to take the time to stop and smell the flowers when you're afraid of stopping so I basically rode 150 miles without getting off the bike. Stopped for gas and lunch. Coaxed the bike back to life and rode another 100+ miles again without stopping. This means that most of the pictures are from my Contour Roam helmet cam.


Once the bike starts it runs great so all in all it was a fabulous ride.


I stopped by the address of the Guzzi dealer listed on the Moto Guzzi Noway homepage and it appears to be a Honda dealer. They were closed when I got there so I'll go back in the morning to get the full scoop.


It seems to be the consensus of the Wild Guzzi forum that my valves need adjusting and if so I guess it will confirm beyond any reasonable doubt that I am a dumb-ass and will have to again take back all the horrible things I said about the good folks at Lake Como.


How can I be a Ravens fan and enjoy eating so much crow?


BTW at 1:30AM in Trondheim the skies still haven't gotten completely dark. Pretty wild.


More Pictures : http://www.twowheelsgood.net/europa2014/?p=737






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Old 07-23-2014, 07:08 AM   #36
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Great ride report. Hope your bike troubles get sorted out soon.

Interesting things happen when you ride a "soulful" machine
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Old 07-24-2014, 12:15 AM   #37
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Day 20



Trondheim Norway



I spent the morning trying to find a mechanic to look at my bike. The "Guzzi"/Honda dealer in Trondheim was useless and showed no interest in helping me. He recommended I try the Yamaha dealer. The folks at the counter at the Yamaha dealership were similarly disinclined to help me. I overheard a German moto traveler riding an old Yamaha 400 single talking to one of the mechanics outside and it was obvious the mechanic was very into bikes so I asked where I might find an independent mechanic to work on my bike. He immediately took an interest in my problem and suggested it might be the temperature sensor and sent me off to try and source one while he contacted Guzzi of Norway. I went to a few different shops and auto parts stores without success and when I returned I mentioned that the Wild Guzzi forum thought it might be an issue with the valve adjustment. He said that I could work on my bike there and I could borrow any tools that I needed.



So I found a Guzzi mechanic but I can't attest to his ability but he works cheap. I did hear him mumble something about " Guzzis" about 30 times but 29 of those where when I was trying to get the air filter out. I ended up checking the air filter, changing the spark plugs, changing the oil and filter and adjusting 3 of the 4 valves. I think the bike started up with more gusto then usual afterwards but that may just be wishful thinking.


Tomorrow I'll be going back to the Yamaha to get the throttle bodies synced and if possible clean the connector for the temp sensor.



If you don't hear from me for a few days it's because I'm back on the road.



BTW, yesterday I mentioned that the sky was not fully dark at 1:30 in the morning. It's fully light at 3:30 in the morning.



Sorry I took zero pictures yesterday.
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Old 07-27-2014, 03:06 PM   #38
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Day 21


Trondheim Norway - Vik Norway


First let me answer the question that is at the forefront of everyone's minds. The answer is forty-two. (Note to self double check your work)
After spending all afternoon on my hands and knees in the unforgiving Nordic sun I passed out around 8pm which is how I found out that it was fully light at 3:30 in the morning. I took a walk around the harbor near my hotel for an hour or so and went back to sleep till 8:30 in the morning. When I pulled into the Yamaha dealership (Ride Trondheim) Torgeir By the head mechanic informed me I was late for work.


A poster on the WildGuzzi forum said he had the same symptoms as I did and resolved it by cleaning the connectors on then cylinder temp sensor. Torgier proceeded to remove the temp sensor and remarked that it wasn't in there very tight. Examining the threads in the cylinder they appear to have been stripped and previously Lock Tighted into place. Torgier proceeded to clean the sensor and the contacts before wrapping the sensor with some thread tape and putting it back in place. He then synced the throttle bodies. Hopefully the fix on the sensor will hold. We then discussed MotoGP for a bit and I said I was going to visit the Trondheim Cathedral. "To pray for the Italians" he remarked meaning the Guzzi and Valentino Rossi.


The Trondheim Catheral is very impressive and well worth a visit. No photography is allowed inside though. The Cathedral took over 150 years to build but in truth has never been finished. Legend says that if the Cathedral was ever finished Trondheim would fall into the sea. To prevent this from happening there is a statue of a mason holding a brick in front of a hole in the wall. Or so I'm told, I couldn't find the statue.


With some trepidation I left Trondheim and started heading north. I took the advice of a Norwegian member of the WildGuzzi forum and made my way to Namsos and started following the coast northwards. The scenery is simply fantastic with roads to match. After hearing horror stories about Norwegian speeding fines I've been trying to keep the Guzzi on a short leash. I swear if I get a $500 speeding ticket for going 3 kph over the limit I'll place the final brick in the Cathedral myself.


At the first ferry crossing of the day (around 8:30pm) two young bicyclists I had passed a while ago showed up. I noticed they were flying a French and German flag so struck up a conversation. Edgar the Frenchman had written to Bremen from Lyons where he met up with Phillip and both of them cycled up here. We discussed how outrageously expensive Norway is and when they whipped out there cooking gear to boil some noodles I offered to buy them both a ($20) burger and fries. I figured so many people have gone out of their way to help me I would try to pay it forward. They were quite grateful and mentioned it was the first meat they had eaten in over two weeks.


When I finally pulled into a campsite around 10:30 pm a Norwegian cyclist came over to talk to me about motorcycles. As it turns out his wife/girlfriend's son is a mechanic at the Yamaha dealership in Trondheim. Small world.


The other news of the day is that the Guzzi started every time on the first try. I could get used to this. I gave the bike a little pat and pep talk each time. Not that I think it will help, but it's a good idea to be nice to machines. It'll only be a short time till they rule the world so we should get used to it.


I could learn to love my little red Italian tomato but my red lemon makes me want to kill an Irishman. Which would be bad.


BTW it's 12:30 in the AM as I write this and it's still light enough to read by.


More Pictures: http://www.twowheelsgood.net/europa2014/?p=798






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Old 07-27-2014, 03:35 PM   #39
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Day 22


Vik Norway – Glomfjord Norway


The previous day I had confirmed that my Guzzi could go over two hundred miles on a tank of gas so the top priority in the morning was filling up at the first available opportunity. I pulled into the first gas station I came across with a car pulling in a few seconds after me. The car driver said “you first” but the card kiosk wasn’t accepting my MasterCard so I said you go ahead and went inside to prepay. I was informed that MasterCard wasn’t working and they didn’t accept cash for gas. I went back outside and said “MasterCard not working” shrugging my shoulders and the car driver said no problem and started filling up my gas tank on his dime. Nice!


I rode coastal road 17 up to Horn to catch then next ferry when two Ducati Superbikes showed up. Followed not long after by a Ducati Mulitstrada. It was practically an Italian bike festival and I struck up a conversation with Bjomar and Geir the two superbike riders. We all rode together to then next ferry which was only about 10 miles away. After that ferry we pulled the classic Tortoise and Hare manuver with Bjomar, Geir, and myself traveling at a rather rapid pace to the next ferry about 40 miles away. Half way there we stopped for a nature brake and waved as the Multistrada went by. When we reached the next ferry we where told it was too full and we would have to wait an hour for the next one while the slow moving Multistrada sailed away. Bjomar was not happy! Geir and I found the situation pretty amusing.


I ended spending the rest of the day riding with Bjomar and Geir. I don’t know how many opportunities you have to fly around the fjords with a couple of competently piloted superbikes from the second best Italian manufacturer but I’ve had one so I chose to take advantage of it. The visibility was pretty poor all day with very low lying grey clouds so it made more sense to make pace while the sun didn’t shine then stop and take countless pictures of grey fjords.


The other event of note was that while we were on the umpteenth ferry of the day the announcement was made that we had crossed the Arctic Circle. Woot!


The Guzzi performed admirably today and I believe I adequately upheld the honor of Lake Como and the boys (and girls) back home.


More Pictures : http://www.twowheelsgood.net/europa2014/?p=855






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Old 07-27-2014, 04:27 PM   #40
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Day 23


Glomford Norway – Stamsund Norway


Today was the day we all danced in the land of the midnight sun.
Bjomar, Geir, and I continued up the coastal road at a leisurely pace to Bodo stopping along the way at the Saltstraumen Natur Preserve to view the worlds largest tidal currents and the whirlpools they create. We ended up catching the 3pm the ferry to Lofoten which I was told I had to visit while I was in Norway. It was a long four hour ferry ride and hopefully the last ferry till I reach Helsinki.


Bjomar and Geir do even less planning than I do which is why we probably travel so well together. We ended up spending hours trying to find a place to sleep before finding a youth hostel in Stamsund. It was past 10:30 in the evening by that time and it appeared I was going be out of luck as far as getting any sustenance (Bjomar and Geir had the foresight to eat on the ferry. I was saving my appetite for what I hoped would be a high quality restaurant Norwegian meal (whatever that is (probably Norwegian Meatballs) ). Fortunately an elderly gentleman staying at the hostel offerred to share what he had with us which consisted of bread, cheese, butter, and small amount of ham. It was delicious.


We then made our way to the town bar and sat outside where we made the acquaintancen of quite a number of very intoxicated locals and learned that our hostel was rated the best hostel in the world by National Geographic. Sometimes it pays not to have a plan. We stayed until the 3AM closing (By which time the sky to east was turning a rosy red though it never even got close to getting dark) and then where invited inside for the after party which was much like the before party except it was indoors with the blinds drawn. Much dancing and merriment followed some of which I believe was recorded and dearly hope never makes it to YouTube. It was a very memorable evening.

Tomorrow I’ll ride with Bjomar and Geir to for a while until they catch a ferry back to the mainland where they’ll start making their way back home and I’ll continue to make my way north.


The Guzzi is still running in fine form since leaving Trondheim.


More Pictures: http://www.twowheelsgood.net/europa2014/?p=882






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Old 07-27-2014, 04:59 PM   #41
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Day 24


Stamsund Norway - North of Narvik Norway


As you might imagine things got to a late start today.


At some point late this morning Geir went out and got some groceries for breakfast which Bjomar cooked and I ate (I try to do my part).


We left the Hostel around 1:30 in the afternoon after not nearly enough sleep and made our way to a couple of towns which I can't remember. Bjomar and Geir's attempt to book ferry passage was the usual comedy of errors but we finally had a chance to get "lunch" around 4:30pm where I bid the two duck riders goodbye.


The plan was to find a campsite early so I could update the blog and get my much needed beauty sleep. Plans being what they are I didn't stop riding till 10pm. The usual practice is to ride till it starts getting dark and then finding a campground. Of course that doesn't work to well up here. Night IS supposed to divide the day and it's really messing with my head. No wonder the Norwegians are so weird.


The Guzzi is still running fine and I've completed my blogging duties so I should go hit the sack except I just drank 4 cups of coffee. Hmmm It's light out, maybe time to go for a ride. Screw that it's freaking cold out there. This may come as a surprise but it's pretty chilly in the Arctic.


The next few days I'll be making haste towards Mehamn Norway and then heading south to warmer and saner climes.


More Pictures : http://www.twowheelsgood.net/europa2014/?p=920






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Old 07-28-2014, 03:54 PM   #42
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Enjoying the ride. Thanks for sharing. You're much better at staying up to date than I am
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Old 07-28-2014, 11:56 PM   #43
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Day 25


North of Narvik Norway - Alta Norway


The day started off cold and misty and got worse as it went on.
Numerous people said that the ride would be boring but the E6 which is the major road up here is quite twisty and if the visibility didn't suck I'm sure the views would have been great. As the day got colder and wetter I started riding faster. I believe that the Politi (Norwegian Police) have no desire to stand around in the cold rain writing tickets and all go huddle around whatever passes for a doughnut shop in Norway so I felt pretty confident upping the pace without getting caught and as the weather worsened traffic also significantly decreased.


My Guzzi has an air temperature sensor but I decided not to check it because it could only tell me one of two things. Either it really was freaking cold and I was too stupid to put on my electric gear or it wasn't that cold and I was just a wimp. So, I decided to be miserable in blissful ignorance. This worked well for a few hundred miles while I pretended that my water proof gear was really water proof. Then I had a very close call with a dog running across the road while I was doing north of 60 mph and decided I should pull over at the next opportunity which turned out to be some Sami souvenir huts at the top of a mountain.


The Sami are the traditional people of the arctic and were amused to see me soaked and shivering uncontrollably on what was a balmy day to them. I got a cup of 'Kaffe' , bummed a cigarette and bought a trinket. Then I peeled off a layer of wet clothes and put on my electrics.


OMG electrics are the best thing since .... I don't know what. But they're way better than sliced bread. I don't get why people get so chuffed over sliced bread, it's not like slicing bread is a particularly arduous task and no longer having to do it significantly improves our lives. Whatever, get a grip people!


Anyways... I decided after waking up in a chilly wet tent that I didn't feel like going to sleep in one so I got a cabin which seems palatial compared to my tent and literally started singing "I'm in love with my Cabin" as I peeled off my wet clothes. The Estonians next door found this funny.
I went across the street from the campground to where a Sami family has a bit of a pub/restaurant/go pet your dinner thing going on and got to eat reindeer in a tent. Probably pissed off Santa Claus but I haven't gotten anything but coal for the last 30 years so Santa can bite me. BTW Reindeer is much better then White Tail deer.


All in all another excellent day.

More Pictures: http://www.twowheelsgood.net/europa2014/?p=979






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Old 07-30-2014, 12:18 AM   #44
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Day 26


Alta Norway - Top of the World - Tana Bru Norway


The day started off cold and grey but this time I wasn't going to be caught out and put on all my cold weather gear. As the day wore on it never really cleared up but the clouds weren't as low as yesterday and so got treated to some wonderful scenery.


Everyone told me that going up north would be boring and there would be nothing to see. Again they couldn't have been more wrong. While the tourists all tend to head to Nordkapp I headed to Mehamn/Gamvik/Slettnes . Nordkapp is the northern most point on the European continent but Slettnes is the northern most point on the European mainland. The tourists go to Nordkapp and the cool kids go to Slettnes. You can quote me on that.


The road leading up to Mehamn was absolutely fantastic both for the scenery and the quality of the road it self. If you ever get a chance to ride to Mehamn listening to Philip Glass I highly recommend it. The surreal layered on the surreal. It was truly sublime.


One thing I've noticed on my travels is that Europeans love to tell you that anywhere there not from, at, or going to is boring. So far they've always been dead wrong. As far as heading to Mehamn is concerned they were spectacularly wrong. Maybe it's a humor thing that gets lost in translation, but they're very consistent.


Tomorrow I should be crossing into Finland. I've really enjoyed my time in Norway. The Fjords were very nice as were the people. Not quite as nice as the Swedes but still very nice ;). Another thing I really liked was all the pretty service girls singing out "Hi-Hi" as you approached the counter. I swear it's the cutest thing since sliced bread.


The one thing I didn't like was the cost. Western Europe is about 1.5 times more expensive then the USA primarily due to the exchange rate I think (except for gas which is about 2.5 times more expensive). Norway is about twice as expensive as the rest of Western Europe. The charm of $20 hamburgers wears off pretty quickly but all in all it was more than worth it.


More pictures: http://www.twowheelsgood.net/europa2014/?p=983







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Old 07-30-2014, 11:09 AM   #45
OscarCharlie
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"Better living through incompetence"... Ha ha, love it!

Enjoying your RR and looking forward to the next installment.
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