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Old 07-21-2014, 02:29 PM   #31
Navy Chief
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TarTripper View Post
Thanks for the wise words guys. I am indeed chastened by this experience and a wiser rider now.

However, one of the main points I was tryingt to get across has perhaps been missed. I know how to adjust a turn, and am comfortable leaning harder when I realise I've gone in too hot (which I don't do often).

What got me this time was target fixation, the 'target' being the other bike.
Nope, I got the point in the initial post. It is extremely difficult to look away from the object that you believe is going to kill you, it is an act of raw will power to to do so.
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Old 07-22-2014, 03:34 AM   #32
dazeedmonds
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What got me this time was target fixation, the 'target' being the other bike.
This happened to me the other day. Jackass made a left turn on a red in front of me, I locked the brakes (unintentionally) and could not move my eyes away from him. I missed the rear end of his truck but it was too close for comfort. That was the first time I'd ever experienced target fixation, it was a little disconcerting to say the least. In my case I.think fatigue may have played a part, I should have recognized that he was going to do something stupid, he was way out in the intersection, but off to my right so I didn't register his truck until he was in front of me. I should have seen him and backed off the throttle, but I had been helping a friend move, and was more tired than I realized.
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Old 07-22-2014, 04:50 AM   #33
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I wonder how Darwinian target fixation is?

As in - Are those who survived, intact, the experience of target fixation, less likely to do it again?

Is it, in a strange and unpleasant way, a valuable experience to have?
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Old 07-22-2014, 04:53 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by catweasel67 View Post
I wonder how Darwinian target fixation is?

As in - Are those who survived, intact, the experience of target fixation, less likely to do it again?

Is it, in a strange and unpleasant way, a valuable experience to have?
I think it is a valuable experience to have, as long as you survive the encounter with said object. It will allow you to experience what the phenomenon is and hopefully allow you to make mental corrections to prevent it in the future.
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Old 07-22-2014, 10:19 AM   #35
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It probably was a good strategy when the "target" was a saber toothed tiger ready to pounce.
Nowadays when it's a pickup truck or a guardrail, and you are moving in relation to the target, maybe not so much.
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Old 07-22-2014, 10:25 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by catweasel67 View Post
I wonder how Darwinian target fixation is?

As in - Are those who survived, intact, the experience of target fixation, less likely to do it again?

Is it, in a strange and unpleasant way, a valuable experience to have?
I don't think you understand how Darwin works...

Target fixation is like a net gain if you are hunting and gathering and not in a machine.

May take a few thousand generations to breed it out of us again.
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Old 07-28-2014, 08:19 PM   #37
PalePhase
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Originally Posted by markk53 View Post
You appear to not have a grasp of what I said or I am misunderstanding what you've said.

It is not sloppy and it is not rolling the dice. It is developing skills in changing position by practicing a bit when the conditions (corners/surfaces) are known or have a good line of sight. Learn how tighten your line and you now have a tool to deal with a surprise decreasing radius turn should you suddenly realize it rounding a blind turn. It is practicing both mentally and physically how to change up a line mid-corner, not pushing the envelope. It is developing both knowledge and faith in the handling of the equipment - especially tires. It is incredible how tenacious the grip of tires can be - far beyond the skill of most riders. I have never had a tire break loose due to leaning on any pavement.

My line changing practice is not haphazard. It is not go zig zag at random, nor is it wobble about like a clown. Fact of the matter speed has nothing to do with it. I do not see where conclusions like that were drawn.
Actually, I was kind of thinking the same thing about your own ability to catch what I was saying. I don't know how I could have made it any plainer but I don't see any ROI on trying to figure out where the disconnect is.
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Old 07-28-2014, 08:28 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TarTripper View Post
Thanks for the wise words guys. I am indeed chastened by this experience and a wiser rider now.

However, one of the main points I was tryingt to get across has perhaps been missed. I know how to adjust a turn, and am comfortable leaning harder when I realise I've gone in too hot (which I don't do often).

What got me this time was target fixation, the 'target' being the other bike.
The problem is that the way to desensitize yourself to opposing objects is time spent in proximity to opposing objects.

Who is going to advocate that?
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