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Old 07-29-2014, 12:12 PM   #31
Danjal
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Being in the transportation industry, many things will come into play. Namely what's left hanging or what's left unsupported. Trucks bounce a lot going down the road. And hard too. Normal consumers wouldn't tolerate the ride we have. I'd assume he's using the center stand so be can tie off easier without the bike being tilted or falling over. Many drivers work alone. If I were shipping,I'd use the center stand and block the front and rear if possible and tie off the bars. Typically the more points of support you have,the less damage and risk of bends or failures. But you also run the risks of wear from your tie downs from the freight moving. Take your pick where you want the risk of damage. I'd go for bars and rims myself. But the constant pressure could blow the seals. There ain't no easy way to transport one short of recrating it in a factory crate.
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Old 07-29-2014, 12:22 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Harris View Post
Google "uship shipper". UShip looks to be a business that connects people who want things shipped and people who can ship.

One link from Google:

http://uship.pissedconsumer.com/ushi...122291057.html

Read the fine print on the shipping contract. See if they can legally employ out-of-work Nigerian 419's to ship stuff. Seriously, see what UShip's responsibility is.

--Bill
Their brokers. Nothing more than middlemen. You call them,they post the load or call a freight carrier to get a reduced rate. Google C.H. Robinson. They make millions literally doing none of the work. People call them and they can get loads. It's nothing more than an organizer for freight. Typically,you can save calling a few companies. I called ups to ship a motor 425 miles, $775. A couple others were about 425-450. Finally called ABF and got $205. Freight quote and ch wanted 350ish. You can always find cheaper than them. Just make sure your shipper and broker know what's being shipped and the limitations of it. Some carriers love to double and triple stack palettes.
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Old 07-29-2014, 03:14 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by Danjal View Post
Being in the transportation industry, many things will come into play. Namely what's left hanging or what's left unsupported. Trucks bounce a lot going down the road. And hard too. Normal consumers wouldn't tolerate the ride we have. I'd assume he's using the center stand so be can tie off easier without the bike being tilted or falling over. Many drivers work alone. If I were shipping,I'd use the center stand and block the front and rear if possible and tie off the bars. Typically the more points of support you have,the less damage and risk of bends or failures. But you also run the risks of wear from your tie downs from the freight moving. Take your pick where you want the risk of damage. I'd go for bars and rims myself. But the constant pressure could blow the seals. There ain't no easy way to transport one short of recrating it in a factory crate.
Not unless you do what Allied does - use a purpose made pallet. Incidentally, tying forks down will NOT blow seals. I've been tying bikes down for forty years and never have had that happen. Tying bikes down on center or side stands can fracture frame lugs, requiring replacement of a frame. Don't do it. The bike will ride just fine on its own suspension system.
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Old 07-29-2014, 03:30 PM   #34
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I still want the guy to show me a Harley on it's center stand.

Just one.

Only thing I can think of (aside from him being a complete lying fool) is that he thinks the side-stand IS the center-stand - a non-motorcyclist may not know that many bikes used to have 2 stands, as so many no longer have center stands.

I have to keep reminding myself not to attribute to malice that which can be explained by simple ignorance.
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Old 07-29-2014, 06:49 PM   #35
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I'm not quite picturing this. When on the centerstand, isn't the front wheel on the ground and forks will compressed anyway?
Not on my R1150R. When on the center stand the front wheel is off the floor and the rear almost is. It just about balances on the center stand.
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Old 07-30-2014, 06:03 AM   #36
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The bike arrived this morning in GREAT shape, no problems.

I spoke with the driver for a little while before I had to go to work.

In the future he is going to give owners the option on how they want the bike tied-down and I gave him my extra pair of soft-ties.
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Old 07-30-2014, 06:56 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by Barnstorm View Post
Actually, the shipper is quite nice and has a 5/5 star rating with several hundred reviews over the past few years.

I am quite aware what UShip does, myself and others I know have used them a number of times, I did not elaborate on that as it was distracting from the topic and might confuse people as to my questions.

UShip, the shipper and myself all have insurance to cover the shipment.

I had hoped this thread would flush out some technical information about trailering bikes.

While I can see some anecdotal posts that agree with my experience and some comforting posts that think a centerstand is "ok" so far we have only one post that brings in authoritative documentation, but it is from a dealer not a manufacturer.

.
I don't know diddly about UShip, having not had the need. Googling "uship shipper" brought up a number of negative comments, which raised a flag with me.

Glad that your shipment worked out.

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Old 07-30-2014, 07:06 AM   #38
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I don't know diddly about UShip, having not had the need. Googling "uship shipper" brought up a number of negative comments, which raised a flag with me.

Glad that your shipment worked out.

--Bill
As previously posted, UShip just connects people with shippers to save you leg work. You set the price you want and shippers bid on it.

As with any system if you are CHEAP and go with a bottom of the barrel bid, you might just get what you pay for.

Each shipper has feedback records that are complete and very detailed. Ratings and price go hand in hand.

It CAN save you some money and time over calling shippers individually, but the service is not for everyone.

I am a little disappointed that I (and apparently everyone that read this tread) was unable to locate any "official" manufacturer documentation on shipping bikes. Through we did get one very good post with a BMW dealers document.

.

Barnstorm screwed with this post 07-30-2014 at 07:35 AM
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Old 07-30-2014, 07:49 AM   #39
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Glad to see that your bike made it to you in fine shape!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Barnstorm View Post
I am a little disappointed that I (and apparently everyone that read this tread) was unable to locate any "official" dealer documentation on shipping bikes. Through we did get one very good post with a BMW dealers document.
I don't know that there is only one official way to transport a bike. In fact I doubt there is. I've seen systems that lock the front wheel down using a rod thru the axle. I've seen systems that lock the bike down using the foot pegs. I've seen "fork Savers" used on dirt bikes to limit the downward travel of the fork when cinching the bike down with straps. I've personally always used tie-down straps, sometimes with a front wheel chock as well.

I feel there are some issues with just using straps against the suspension. They are convenient and flexible but they are not fool proof. Especially if large and harsh bumps are encountered (As mentioned above, cargo trailers and high capacity trucks bounce HARD compared to a regular passenger truck unless it's loaded to near max capacity)

The biggest issue I have using straps to compress the suspension is that while the give that is left in the suspension may help protect hard parts during a hard bounce it also allows the straps to go slack at the same moment. If the ends of the straps are hooks they can come off at that moment, and bad things happen. I feel there is always a small question of "How tight do I need to make these straps for the trip I'm taking today" I don't want to fully compress the suspension yet I want them tight enough that I don't have a hard bounce cause a strap to come loose either.

One rider I know uses a pretty neat process. He straps the bike down and compresses the suspension a bit, then uses an elastic shock cord attached to the ends of each strap at the hooks base so that if the bike does bounce and compress the suspension the shock cord keeps pressure on the hooks to keep them from popping off.
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Old 07-30-2014, 07:58 AM   #40
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Originally Posted by Barnstorm View Post
I am a little disappointed that I (and apparently everyone that read this tread) was unable to locate any "official" manufacturer documentation on shipping bikes. Through we did get one very good post with a BMW dealers document.
Go to a dealership and ask to peek inside a couple crates?

I know I bought my Aprilia from (dealer in Idaho that shall go nameless) and after prepping it, they strapped it back into the crate so tight they bent the handlebars... but the forks have never leaked.
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Old 07-30-2014, 08:00 AM   #41
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constant pressure on the seals won't blow them any more than the variable pressure as you ride that is a mith perpetarted by the ignorint
lashing it down on the suspension is fine but it still must be done with care, front and back to ride securely on a bouncy truck
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Old 07-30-2014, 08:05 AM   #42
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The bike arrived this morning in GREAT shape, no problems.

I spoke with the driver for a little while before I had to go to work.

In the future he is going to give owners the option on how they want the bike tied-down and I gave him my extra pair of soft-ties.
sweet twingle !!! there is one of those for sale locally in similar looking condition for $2600 izzat a fair price ?
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Old 07-30-2014, 10:45 AM   #43
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sweet twingle !!! there is one of those for sale locally in similar looking condition for $2600 izzat a fair price ?
Perhaps. Is it a square tank or a round tank?

A round tank with title in running condition and very good cosmetics goes for 3-4K depending on mileage and extras like original tool kit, manuals, air pump..

A round tank in fair condition should be in the 1.5-3K range.

Square tanks go for about 1/2 the value of a similar round tank.
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Old 07-30-2014, 11:28 AM   #44
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P.S. I know of a 1966 250 twingle (split single) round tank for sale from a dealer.

It is very, very good shape with low miles, paperwork and title.

If anyone wants the contact info, just let me know.

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Old 07-30-2014, 11:32 AM   #45
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http://medford.craigslist.org/mcy/4589865653.html

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