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Old 08-01-2014, 08:05 AM   #16
Jim Moore
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Here is when to move up. Turn onto an interstate onramp. Run it up to redline at full throttle in second, third, fourth, and fifth. Move up when you do that and think, "Meh."
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Old 08-01-2014, 09:36 AM   #17
Human Ills
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I see no reason to get a middleweight unless that's what you want.
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Old 08-01-2014, 11:24 AM   #18
High Country Herb
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You said you didn't think you want an I4, but you weren't clear as to why. Power too peaky? Throttle too sensitive? You just don't get excited by the sound of the motor?

I think you will need at 600cc for highway 2-up riding. Something else to keep in mind is passenger comfort. A 600 sportbike will not have comfortable seating for a passenger taller than about 5' 2".

The SV650 is a great sporty choice that would meet most of what you want to do. I am not familiar with passenger seating, so maybe someone else could comment on that. The DL650 has a similar motor, but probably more passenger comfort, but will be a lot less sporty. Better luggage options, though.

Depending on how much you have to spend, and availability in your area, you might also consider an Aprilia Shiver 750. They have adjustable throttle response/horsepower, so are very versatile. Also pretty decent passenger comfort for such a sporty bike. New prices are a couple thousand more than Japanese, but they can be had for about the same used.
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Old 08-01-2014, 02:38 PM   #19
hardtarge
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this riding season is just about over. . . .

Don't do anything other then window shop. what do you and the pillion fit on?

2up?? how serious is the pillion partner?

Do you have gear for both of you?

how serious of 2up do you intend?? ever leaving greater Metro area?? plan on heading east to Newfoundland? or west?

if you are really serious about moving up.

hit the bike show up in March you'll probably find a 500 dollar coupon apply this coupon to a left over bit 2012/13/14 of choosing.

REASONING: I watched a guy pickup a brand new 2013 KLR for 4800 bucks Leftover kawi discount plus bike show voucher/coupon this last april about 15 min before i bought my own 2013 klr

hardtarge screwed with this post 08-01-2014 at 02:48 PM
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Old 08-01-2014, 02:58 PM   #20
riverflow
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Originally Posted by Human Ills View Post
I see no reason to get a middleweight unless that's what you want.
And it very well may be. My 650 thumper is quite a bit of bike, and other 600's have double the ponies that I have. Most people's riding ability will never outgrow the capabilities of a good 600ish bike. Liter bikes start to distinguish themselves at interstate speeds.

In addition to the SV, I'd try an FZ6 and a VFR 800 if you have any around.
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Old 08-01-2014, 03:10 PM   #21
SloMo228
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I've been riding over a decade now and the only (assembled) bike I own now is a 350, and I love it. However, I don't ride 2-up, and freeways are a struggle. There's just no getting around those limitations of a small-engined bike, so if that is what you want to be doing, then yeah, you'll need to "upgrade."

But like others in this thread have posted, I don't necessarily see a bigger and faster bike to be an "upgrade" and lighter, smaller, slower bikes as something to be discarded and left behind forever as one's riding skills improve.
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Old 08-01-2014, 07:54 PM   #22
quux
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You must decide if it is time to get a bigger bike. As people here have said bigger isn't an upgrade it just does different things. How often do you plan to go two up? What type of riding do you do? What are the roads like where you are? With the number of miles you have done you have probably progressed past the fastest learning curve that a small bike is most important for. That is not to say that it doesn't do some things better than anything larger. Coming from the ninja 250 some bikes to check out would be the ninja 650, the sv650, the fz 09, and if going two up most of the time i'd probably go with the ninja 1000.
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Old 08-02-2014, 04:22 AM   #23
JohnCW
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if going two up most of the time i'd probably go with the ninja 1000.
Great bike, but that's a big step up from a Ninja 250. Could someone do it, no doubt. I ride with a lot of guys who've gone to their dream bike without 'serving their apprenticeship' and I definitely reckon its held many of them back.
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Old 08-02-2014, 04:34 AM   #24
Max L
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SPEND SOME DIRT BIKE TIME IF YOU HAVE OR HAVE NOT. DIRT SKILLS ARE WONDERFUL TO HAVE ON ANY STREET . THEY OFFER DIRT SCHOOLS IN MOST AREAS. ONE FULL DAY OF FUN AND YOU LEARN OR REFRESH ON SOFT DIRT. QUOTE=opticalmace;24746957]Hi all,

I have a new-gen Ninja 250R. This is my second season, and I have about 13000km on it. I enjoy the bike and I think that I am learning a lot. I have definitely made some mistakes but it seems quite forgiving. I'm certainly nowhere near the skill ceiling fn the bike.

I have heard some people say that it's easier to increase your technical proficiency as a new rider on a smaller bike than a bigger bike. Now, I would like a bike better suited to 2-up riding, with better comfort than my Ninja. However, I don't want to retard my skill development. For the most part I am fine with the power of the 250, though at highway speeds (or from a dead stop) it can be tiresome. In fact I test rode some fast bikes and I really don't want an inline 4.

I'm a little split between sticking with my 250 to try to sharpen my skills or going to something a bit bigger that is perhaps more suitable to my needs. Ideally I would have one of each bike, but that is not practical now.

Any advice? Thanks.[/QUOTE]
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Old 08-02-2014, 09:51 AM   #25
shelion
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I started on a 750 cruiser, 'upgraded' to an 1150 sporty standard, and now very happily ride a 650 dual sport. If I had it to do over again, I would have gone straight to the dual sport without the big bike in between. The 1150 had way more power than I needed and wasn't very well-suited to the riding that I actually do.

Consider how you ride 80-90% of the time and get a bike that does that well. It makes no sense to buy a big heavy bike for 2-up riding when you'll only have an occasional passenger.

At highway speeds, 150-200 lbs of more motorcycle isn't too noticeable. At low speeds and while parking, 150-200 lbs of more motorcycle is really, really noticeable.

And as others have said, as long as you keep riding, your skills will continue to develop. There will be a learning curve when you get a new bike because there is always a learning curve with any bike that's new to a rider-it's bike they haven't ridden before. The steepness of the curve is dependent upon the rider themselves and gets flatter as they gain seat time.
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Old 08-02-2014, 10:18 AM   #26
dazeedmonds
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Originally Posted by shelion View Post

Consider how you ride 80-90% of the time and get a bike that does that well. It makes no sense to buy a big heavy bike for 2-up riding when you'll only have an occasional passenger.

At highway speeds, 150-200 lbs of more motorcycle isn't too noticeable. At low speeds and while parking, 150-200 lbs of more motorcycle is really, really noticeable.

+a whole bunch.

If the bike won't do what you want, and let you enjoy doing it, you've wasted money. Like a helmet two sizes too small won't do you any good no matter how nice it is.
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Old 08-02-2014, 05:10 PM   #27
jgiacobbe
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Started myself on an 07 ninjette. Bought a DL650 in 09. It was a decent move but much more top heavy. Dropped it within the first mile. I had also considered a versus and a ninja 650. Versus was a no go because of the small pillion seat for the Mrs.The ninja or sv650 might be easier transitions due to similar ergos and lack of top heaviness.

I do miss my 250. Might get another one or one of the new 300s one day.
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Old 08-02-2014, 05:38 PM   #28
SmithSwede
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Careful with the logic of "upgrade." Getting a different bike will be a change, but don't assume that bigger is necessarily better or an "upgrade."

I've been riding 35 years--my little Ninja 250 is one of my all time favorite bikes. Just stupid fun.

But, it's not the best choice for two-up. I'd suggest keeping the 250 for all your solo rides, and get whatever you want for the two up duty.
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Old 08-03-2014, 05:40 AM   #29
markk53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by opticalmace View Post
Hi all,

I have a new-gen Ninja 250R. This is my second season, and I have about 13000km on it. I enjoy the bike and I think that I am learning a lot. I have definitely made some mistakes but it seems quite forgiving. I'm certainly nowhere near the skill ceiling fn the bike.

I have heard some people say that it's easier to increase your technical proficiency as a new rider on a smaller bike than a bigger bike. Now, I would like a bike better suited to 2-up riding, with better comfort than my Ninja. However, I don't want to retard my skill development. For the most part I am fine with the power of the 250, though at highway speeds (or from a dead stop) it can be tiresome. In fact I test rode some fast bikes and I really don't want an inline 4.

I'm a little split between sticking with my 250 to try to sharpen my skills or going to something a bit bigger that is perhaps more suitable to my needs. Ideally I would have one of each bike, but that is not practical now.

Any advice? Thanks.

I'd say when you don't need to ask a question like that it is time - aka you actually can ride the bike well enough to start/stop, accerate, brake, and turn/corner with confidence and know it is time for the change.

Key point here, I'm talking riding skills, not confidence that you can handle traffic.

I'm not sure any good rider has full confidence that they can easily handle all traffic situations, and thus are constantly on guard and observant while in/around traffic.
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Old 08-04-2014, 06:55 AM   #30
atomicalex
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Due to some engine issues with my F650, I ended up with a CBR250R. Going back and forth between the two gave me a lot of perspective.

The big bike is great. I love it to death. But that 250 was motorcycling crack. It was kind of useless as a tourer or anything the big bike was great at, but for pure joy in riding, OMG, nothing compared to that baby CBR. Total gigglefest. And I would hop on it and marvel about how it just went where I looked.

Can you keep both? At 13K kms in two seasons, you are surely ready to move up. You don't have to, but you can.
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